Hey, That’s My Stuff!

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I have written before about the fraud triangle and how the three elements, pressure, opportunity and rationalization, tend to be the factors that drive a person to commit fraud. Well, a few days ago, my husband and I were talking about Scott London and his insider trading charges. We began discussing the issues in relation to the fraud triangle – what was the pressure that he felt and how did he rationalize his actions? The opportunities for him to pass information on to his friend were, as far as he was concerned, quite plenty as he was operating outside of the system in which he worked and its established controls. However, he had not fully factored in the FBI and the SEC and their activities to attempt to thwart fraud.

My husband then said – but how do you really take away the opportunity? I don’t understand how you can really stop someone from trying to steal. That is true, however, you can put in safeguards to make it very difficult for the theft to occur, I responded. My husband, a photographer, is in the process of moving into a new studio space so I decided to use this as a way to explain my point.

Before moving his equipment and furniture into the space, my husband spent a lot of time thinking about the security in the building he is moving into. He walked around the premises, noting where the security office was located, in relation to his studio; he took a look at the various points of entry into the space and assessed how easy it would be for someone to gain unauthorized access; and he looked at the building and what security it came with. Armed with this information, he then sat down and made a plan. He researched alarm systems, door and window locks and various barriers to entry of his studio. Also, within his studio, he took steps to further secure his equipment with lock-boxes, storage containers and other measures. This, I told him, is how you attempt to take away the opportunity. He could have moved into the office spaces as is, without taking any steps to secure his space and its contents, but he did not. He took the time and energy to dissuade a potential intruder from entering his space. By making it as difficult has possible for someone to get into his space, he is working to break the triangle.

Controls to protect ones assets can be physical, as with the studio space, or procedural, as with an authorization process for processing checks in an accounts payable department. In both cases, they are very important when it comes to trying to break the fraud cycle and prevent theft, insider trading or whatever the crime of the day is.

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2 thoughts on “Hey, That’s My Stuff!

  1. […] about the steps my husband took to install physical barriers to access to his belongings in his studio. These are the types of steps that you should take in physically safeguarding your inventory, your […]

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  2. […] theft had been exposed, Christopher Myles sent an email to all parties involved. In this email, he RATIONALIZED his fraud, claiming that he was entitled to the funds because he was due a raise and compensation […]

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