I Trust You, But…

Image

Last Saturday, my husband showed off some of his work in an open studios event at Industry City. He did the lion’s share of the work but, on Friday evening, he asked me to come over and help him a little. He assigned me the job of placing 5×7 prints of some of his work in 5×7 frames. It sounds straightforward enough and I am sure that my husband trusts me and has great confidence in my abilities. Nevertheless, after I had framed a few photos, he came over and checked my work. It turned out that some of the photos were not quite centered in their frames. He handed them to me, offered me some tips on how best to center photos in frames, and asked me to redo them.

This reminded me of when I was a kid and my parents would check my homework. I know that they felt that I could do it. I know this because they would say things like, “You can do better than this; try again.”Most of the time the issue was that my handwriting was barely legible on a good day. Knowing that my work would be reviewed, on days when I was tempted to rush through my homework, maybe because I wanted to play or watch TV, I willed myself to slow down and get it done correctly the first time around. I did not want to get into trouble and I definitely did not want to have to do my homework over again.

Recently, I have been reading stories about people in charge of a business’s finances perpetuating fraud. These people carried on their shenanigans and were not caught until the businesses they were employees of were practically going under. You know why? Because no one ever checked their work. Ever. In the cases that I read, the business owners were all charmed by the charismatic and capable people that they hired to manage their finance departments. The business owners gave these managers unfettered access to the companies’ bank and credit accounts and, boy, did those managers take full advantage of this access. They opened new credit accounts, they maxed out existing accounts and they went shopping! These business owners only found out what was going on when purchases they were trying to make were declined because their accounts were wiped out. In every case, the owners had left the finances up to the managers that they had hired so that they could focus on operations. They seemed to forget that an essential part of a business is the money needed to run it. They did not keep tabs on where the money went after it came in.

Because none of us is infallible and because too many among us are not always honest, it is vital that work is checked by someone else. Depending on the size and complexity of an entity, there are various ways in which to incorporate checks into a system to prevent and detect error and fraud.

  • There must always be a review of another party’s work. In a very small business, this may mean that the business owner is periodically reviewing bank and credit card statements. It may mean that the business owner will check incoming mail on a random basis, to make sure that unauthorized statements have not been opened in the name of the business. In larger businesses, there should be processes where the work done by one employee is reviewed by another employee for error and misstatement.
  • Someone other than the person booking cash entries in the ledger should perform reconciliations of the bank and credit accounts. Reviews and reconciliations of payable and receivable accounts should also be performed.
  • Make sure that staff take vacations and that, while they are on vacation, someone else does their work. In this way if anything is amiss, a new pair of eyes may catch mistakes or other missteps that are being made. In addition to this, having someone else do the work also means that one person does not have exclusive knowledge of a process in a business. In this way, no employee is indispensable. Also, when more people understand a process, and employee is less likely to try hide fraud in the process.
  • If possible, move work around among employees, again, so that more people in a department have a greater understanding of what is going on. The saying is familiarity breeds contempt; it can also breed careless errors. People operating in autopilot can become too comfortable with the work that they are doing and make careless mistakes because they are not paying close enough attention to the work.

Check, check and check again. If people know that there are effective checks in a system, they are likely to be discouraged from trying to steal from an entity. If people know that their work will be checked, they are more likely to pay attention to details so that they don’t have to do the work over again. Even when I was frustrated because the photographs seemed to shift all by themselves when I tried to secure them in the frames, I growled, I complained, and I started over and over again until I got it right. You know why? Well, because I like to do a job well AND I didn’t want my husband handing the work back to me and calling me out on getting it wrong.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: