It’s A Good Hurt

This morning, after my run, I pulled out my yoga mat and foam roller and embarked on my post-run stretches. I am yet to come across a runner who looks forward to the stretching – most of us confess to not stretching enough. And as much as we deplore the stretching we tend to do that more often than the foam rolling. This is because, despite the benign name, the foam roller is an instrument of torture. When I have taken yoga classes, teachers have asked me if I am a runner. They ask this, not because my yoga skills are impressive, but because my leg muscles are so tight that touching my toes is a feat; it’s not a good look. These tight leg muscles are what I target with the foam roller. I am terrible at stretching because stretching after a run is mind-numbing tedium. I am atrocious at using my foam roller after a run because trying to loosen up my tight muscles after a run hurts like hell. However, if I don’t loosen up these muscles, I am setting myself up for injuries and pain that will keep me from running for a lot longer than it takes to suffer through the rolling.

The same is true of many aspects of an entity’s financial system. There are many controls that are recommended by accountants and auditors that may seem like overkill or painfully tedious. However, as I have explained in some of my posts regarding aspects of control systems, such as segregation of duties and double entry accounting, being proactive about creating and maintaining a robust financial control system goes a long way to keeping things from going horribly wrong in the future. I will be the first person to tell you that there are many parts of an accounting system that are not fun. For example, it would be so much easier to have checks come into a company and be dumped on an accountant’s desk and have that one accountant deal with recording the check in the books, depositing the check in the bank and then reconciling the bank statement at the end of the month. Way too many companies opt for the easier path and find many ways to justify their decisions – the accountant has been with them for years, the accountant is such a nice person and totally trustworthy and wouldn’t act in an unethical manner. It’s an easy path until the money is stolen and, more often than not, not recovered. Too many stories of beloved staff members who have turned out to be fraudsters and thieves should show people that a great personality is not an acceptable control measure. Way too many times, we discover that the friendly coworkers are able to perpetuate their crime for a long time because they just seem too good to be crooks.

Record-keeping can seem like such a drag. I mean, what fun is there is debits and credits and keep track of income statements and balance sheets. Oh, and don’t get me started on the headaches that a balance sheet that doesn’t balance can bring. Why would anyone want to keep track of order forms, receipts and other elements of an audit trail? When making an adjustment to the ledger, you know that you will totally remember why you processed the change, even ten years from now. You don’t need to provide backup or keep a record of why you made the change. You wouldn’t believe how often I hear this kind of talk from accountants. Six months later, practically none of them can explain a journal entry that doesn’t have backup and this is for the accountants that have not decided to move on to another company, leaving the person who has taken over their position completely in the dark. Especially since we live in an age when people are not married to one job for life, it is essential that anyone looking at a transaction can find out just about everything there is to know about the transaction without having to employ the services of a forensic accountant.

There are times when I start nodding off just at the thought of the some of the processes I need to go through. Sometimes I think – I don’t really need to check this; the accountant has done this a hundred times, so it is probably okay. But then I think about what might happen if I am incorrect. The thought of how much more I will have to do if I don’t perform the check and then have to clean up the mess afterward pushes me to suck it up and do things correctly the first time. When, on occasion, I find an error, I know that it’s good that I decided to do the right thing. Also, the fact that those in the finance department know that work is being reviewed and being given a look-over by others is a great deterrent to those tempted to engage in nefarious behavior. I also remind myself of this when my own work is being reviewed and my ego has to be reminded that even I can make mistakes and that, in the name of outputting a superior product, the checks on work are not only good but necessary.

Running a business is not all fun, games and glamour. There are times when the physically and mentally painful work must be done in order for the business to succeed and minimize errors and fraud. I groan in pain and have to will myself to remain diligent and not cheat on the foam rolling. The neighbors may wonder what is going on but I know that this is how I can minimize injuries and keep on running happy and healthy. Likewise, though I make less noise (at least, I think I make less noise) about some of the work that I have to do, I know that this is what must be done to keep the company happy and healthy. So, do what hurts – it’s good for you.

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3 thoughts on “It’s A Good Hurt

  1. […] She explains this comparison in more detail and far better than I do in her article at The F Student – It’s a Good Hurt. […]

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  2. […] – The F Student – It’s a Good Hurt – Exercise is boring. Sometimes the stretching after a run is painful. Yet exercise is […]

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  3. […] make off with it and, thus, your future money. I have spoken many times about many ways to prevent fraud and error with financial statements, but a lot of these steps can be translated into making sure that you […]

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