Watchoo Talkin’ ‘Bout

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Before I studied accounting, I went to college and got a degree in economics and mathematics. Armed with this degree in issues of money and numbers, I figured that accounting would be a relative walk in the park. I had learnt about debits and credits in economics, I had created intricate formulae in mathematics and I had tested theories on what had happened during the Salem witch trials in statistics, so I felt more than ready for accounting. Boy, was I wrong.
It had been a while since I had felt so overwhelmed. Nothing that I read made sense to me. When I asked my coworkers, who had been studying accounting for a while, they were confused. How could I not understand the accounting concepts. I was studying the most basic things – how could it not make sense. I spoke to my parents and warned them that I might not last in accounting. I prepared them for my failure. My mother, who had taken some coursework in accounting, stated that she had faith that I would work things out. It’s nice to have family who have faith in you, even when all around you look at you like you are the biggest dummy about. She encouraged me to look at some of the books that she had, “Maybe they will help.” I did and, fortunately for me, I found a book that explained accounting in a way that made it all clear to me. I almost couldn’t believe that it had been so difficult before. Now, I felt like I had a brain and it was more than luck that had gotten me through college the first time around.
As I have mentioned before, forensic accounting is a specialty practice of accounting where the work done is suitable for a court of law. The work done here is in anticipation of or as a result of litigation. Often a forensic CPA, usually Certified in Financial Forensics, will testify as a forensic expert before a judge and jury. Forensic CPAs are also often expected to present reports to their clients, to judges or to juries. Because most of the audiences that forensic accountants speak to are not financial experts in any way, it is imperative that they can communicate their work in a way that is understood by all the parties that they deal with. One of those parties could be you.
Many people that I talk to, who have accountants, have no idea exactly what their accountants do, or why. What they are is grateful that their taxes are filed on time and that they either had a small tax liability or a decent refund. This should never be your attitude with your forensic CPA and you should not give the time of day to a forensic accountant who does not explain everything to you. When it comes to forensic issues, you, as a client dealing either directly with a forensic CPA or through a lawyer, are the party to the potential litigation. Doesn’t it just make sense that you know exactly what is going on? Also, if they can’t explain things to you, how much faith could you have that they will be able to explain it to anyone else? My attitude is, if they are not doing a good job with me, and I’m the one hiring them, how can I expect them to do a good job anywhere else?
You should have a forensic accountant that you understand, are comfortable with and doesn’t treat you as though you are not smart enough to understand the complicated work that they do. Yes, the work they do can be very complex and involved but, part of being a good forensic accountant, is being able to take this complicated work and explain it in a way that can be understood by a jury of ones peers (generally a jury of people who did not major in accountancy). I often hear the phrase “explain it as though you are talking to a six year old”, but I would be happy if it was explained to me like someone was talking to an economics and mathematics major. Don’t let them make you feel dumb. Chances are, if they do, they may not be so clever themselves.

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2 thoughts on “Watchoo Talkin’ ‘Bout

  1. […] – Figuring Financial Forensics – Watchoo Talkin’ ‘Bout – Great reminder from Rumbi Bwerinofa that we accountants need to speak simply enough that […]

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  2. […] reinforced, for me, the power of collaboration, effective communication and, without a doubt, of having someone find you the perfect wave to ride. […]

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