When To Fold ‘Em

Sports-betting

We are a household of sports fans and this tends to be just about the only live television that we watch. Because we can’t fast forward through the commercials during live games, I have watched commercials about daily fantasy sports. A lot of commercials about daily fantasy sports (DFS). It doesn’t matter whether it is DraftKings or FanDuel, as they both seem just about the same. I have heard about how you can win millions, practically for free, and about how easy it all is. I know nothing about fantasy sports, and I have come away mostly irritated by how ubiquitous the advertising is than wanting to try out the daily fantasy sports scene. I also don’t trust them when they tell me that I could win money for nothing and, instead, I wonder how they could claim to give away so much money for nothing and still pay for the many, many ads that are everywhere we look.

Answers came to me at the beginning of October, when a DFS scandal hit the news. As the story went, a DraftKings employee released key information earlier than he should. This information, if known, would give someone a tactical edge when playing fantasy football. The same employee also won $350,000 betting at FanDuel. Even though this doesn’t look good, DraftKings says they are certain that, even with an extra $350,000 in his pocket, their employee did not act improperly – he merely made a mistake. As I read the story, I shook my head in disbelief. I was surprised by several things. First of all, I was surprised to discover that Daily Fantasy Sports betting is not considered to be gambling. Now, I know hardly anything about daily fantasy sports, so it may indeed be a game of skill and not luck. However, especially with terms like “betting” used when talking about it, it sure does look a lot like gambling. That said, interviews that I have seen and read show those who spend a lot of money on DFS referring to it as investing. Nevada recently shut down DraftKings and FanDuel, declaring that DFS is gambling and that the two companies need licences before they can operate in that state. So, in that regard, let’s go with more and more people are agreeing with me on the whole “is it gambling” question.

More surprising, though, was the employee betting. To have a company that runs the betting allow its employees to bet as well smacks of impropriety, regardless of whatever steps the companies claimed they took to keep things on the up and up. Both FanDuel and DraftKings would not let their employees bet with them but those same employees, armed with whatever insider information they might (or might not) have, were able to go to competitor sites and bet there. And bet they did and how surprised are we to find out that the top winners in daily fantasy sports tended to be employees of DraftKings and FanDuel (though never from their own employer, of course).

As I read articles and watched news pieces on what was going on in the Daily Fantasy Sports realm, I kept exclaiming, to anyone within earshot, “who thought this was okay? How could they think it was okay?”

I couldn’t believe that management at this company could look at the set up was acceptable. Maybe they did, or maybe they just thought they could get away with it but it has me wondering about what operation and control policies other entities have in place that either do not protect them and their assets, or even put them at greater risk. Just because you institute a rule, it does not mean that it is a good or useful rule. For instance, DraftKings employees, with all the inside information they potentially had access to, could not place a bet with their employer, DraftKings. However, they could log into FanDuel, their competitor and use their edge when placing bets there. And the policy was mirrored by FanDuel. Looking in from the outside, both companies appeared to be acting unethically, and just about always, perceptions are as powerful as reality. If it looks as though someone is having a $350,000 party with your money, the facts will matter very little to you.

It might feel very managerial to make rules in your organization, but if all they serve to do is fill operations manuals and make you feel good, they are achieving less than nothing. It is worse than not making rules at all because, at least when you don’t have regulations, you have no illusions about whether or not you are protected. On the other hand, creating a free for all entity may make you feel like the cool kid and may even have people clamoring to work for you. However, among those clamoring, it is almost guaranteed, will be those seeing ample opportunity to commit fraud and perhaps lay waste to your business. There are very important reasons why people like me preach setting up your business in ways that prevent and detect fraud and two of these reasons are protecting your assets and protecting your reputation.

Now, FanDuel and DraftKings are finding themselves on the defensive and being given the cold shoulder by entities who do not want to be tainted by the growing scandals. They are being investigated by state and federal authorities, and are now scrambling to clean up an image that would never have been sullied if they had formed their operating and control structures correctly and ethically, in practice and appearance, from the get go. Now they are tripping over themselves, doing things like creating self-regulatory bodies in order to regain the trust of the public. Judging from what I have read, that is not working very well – something that happens when a company has betrayed the public’s trust. Instead these companies are being put under the microscope and their reputation is taking a beating. They are on the defensive now and all of this could have very easily been avoided. If you are running a business, you should ensure that you consult with a qualified professional to avoid issues such as:

  • Conflict of interest in perception and reality;
  • Approaches that compromise your reputation; and
  • Procedures that may cross legal lines.

Spending time and resources doing things property in the first place is less costly, in dollars and reputation, than trying to clean things up after the damage is done. That kind of disaster can be very difficult to come back from. Is it something you are ready to bet on?

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One thought on “When To Fold ‘Em

  1. Jim Ulvog says:

    I know so little about DFS that your article greatly expanded my knowledge. Thanks.

    My favorite line from your post:
    “who thought this was okay? How could they think it was okay?”

    Maybe I just don’t understand, but how could someone seriously think this won’t get challenged as gambling, that the business model won’t attract close attention from people who understand business models, and that there won’t be harsh questioning of whether it is okay for staff to participate at related sites?

    What could possibly go wrong when advertising says payouts can be in the thousands or maybe even a million to an individual player and the web site of one of the companies promises payouts this year of two billion dollars? Doesn’t it seem obvious that the Nevada gambling regulators, FTC, many state AGs, and tons of reporters will start asking serious questions?

    Like

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