Keep Rolling

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When I first started running, I was out training, and my knee suddenly buckled in pain. I thought I had broken something, but it turned out that I had IT band syndrome. I tried several approaches to get better. Among these, I would change up my routes so that I was balancing out which leg was favored, I worked to improve my gait and I started foam rolling. No one warned me about that rolling. I think tears sprung to my eyes that first day I foam rolled. I know for sure that I yelped in pain, several times (thankfully I was alone). I couldn’t believe that I was supposed to do this every day, but I had to roll through the pain because I had a race on my schedule and I needed my knee to start working again.

After rolling consistently, I was amazed by how much better everything worked. I was also incredibly relieved that the rolling didn’t hurt so much anymore. I was a foam rolling disciple and whenever anyone told me they were contemplating taking up running, I urged them to also contemplate taking up foam rolling. At a point, I actually found joy in foam rolling. I could get through a rolling session with nary a yelp. It was glorious.

Recently, foam rolling slipped out of my life. After a fall apparently chipped a piece of my knee into non-existence, I could not run at all and I was, instead, focused on weight training to strengthen my knees. At the end of a week of working out, the trainer advised a foam rolling session. I didn’t even think twice; I hadn’t been running, how bad could things be? Painfully terrible, it turns out.

Managing controls in a business works in a similar manner. Sometimes, when a company sets up or has an auditor highlight weaknesses in its control systems, the company will go about creating policies and procedures that address risks and institute controls. At times, with that company, new hires will be given these manuals to read and, if they are lucky, these new employees will receive training. This training will teach the employees about the culture of the company and how to follow policies and procedures, in order to minimize risk within that company. However, how often will that company review its policies and procedures to see if they are relevant to technological advances and new risks that have arisen?

  • How often will the company’s leadership review policies and procedures with existing staff, to ensure that people have not slacked off and are still, for instance, getting the approvals that they are supposed to obtain for transactions?
  • Is anyone checking that reconciliations are occurring monthly (or at whatever frequency has been established) and, once performed, that those reconciliations are being reviewed by the relevant staff?
  • If there is a policy for checks over a certain amount to be signed by two signatories, is anyone reviewing to make sure this is the case?
  • When employees have left the company, have their access to the company’s system been suspended? Once suspended, have their accounts been deleted so that no one else in the company can use them? If they were signatories for bank accounts, has the bank been informed and has the bank removed them from the signatory list?
  • Have the company’s staff received training in how to reduce the risk of phishing?
  • Has the company’s leadership received any training themselves to update them on current risks and to remind them what the policies and procedures of the company are?

These are just a few examples of the many ways in which a company should be regularly checking in and exercising its control muscles. If all you are doing is handing over a manual on day one and assuming that your staff knows what and how they need to do things, you are only setting yourself up for possible pain in the future.

  • Can you be surprised if one of your staff members gets phished and hackers gain access to your company? Think about the pain of finding out that someone pretending to be the CEO sent an email that instructed accounts payable to wire a sizeable amount of money to an offshore account and that accounts payable fell for the scam?
  • If no one is regularly reconciling accounts, can you really be shocked when you discover that an employee has taken advantage of this lack of oversight and embezzled money?
  • If accounts of former employees are not properly suspended and deleted, how will you figure out who has been using them since the former employee left? How will you be able to trace unauthorized transactions?
  • If your company’s leadership is not up to date on policies and procedures, how can they enforce them? At that point, everyone will be just guessing and hoping for the best. Being unprepared and hoping for the best tends to only work out well in the movies.

Maintaining and updating policies and procedures should be a proactive and continuous activity. Speak with a forensic CPA about how to create, institute and regularly review your control systems to reduce risk in your company. It may seem like schlep in the beginning, but having the systems serves a deterrent to those contemplating wrongdoing, it also keeps your staff more educated about how, for instance, they can recognize errors or attempts to suck them into a scam. This can also mean that when something is going awry, it is spotted earlier, minimizing possible losses.

You should be doing this to avoid or, at the very least, minimize any future pain. You don’t want to be like me where incredible pain leads to you even more pain, on the eventual path to healing. Take it from my IT band, proactive is so much better than reactive.

 

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