Just In Case

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I’m that person. Next to you on the plane. Pulling out that safety booklet and reading it, from beginning to end. I’m that person. Listening attentively while the flight attendants go through their entire routine, from how to buckle and unbuckle your seatbelt, to the reminder to not inflate your lifejacket until you are outside the plane. Every time, I’m that person. I look around for the nearest exit and sometimes do a mental calculation of my best route there. I check in the booklet to see where my lifejacket is supposed to be and I sometimes feel about to make sure that the booklet is correct. As often as I have flown, I take the time to go through the process and remind myself of what I know and to see if there is something I have missed in the past or a new instruction that may have been added.

Sometimes I wonder if it’s a bit much. However, recently when a plane in New York City made an emergency landing, video taken by a passenger showed that many people on that plan had no idea how to operate the lifejackets and way too many of them had inflated their lifejackets while still inside the plane. This may have been related to panic during a stressful situation but, from looking around me during the pre-flight safety instruction session, it seems the bigger issue is that most passengers just don’t pay attention. There are more interesting or pressing matters that command our attention and, specifically for those who fly often, we are likely lulled into an arrogance of the familiar. We have done this many times before, we must know exactly what’s up at this point. It may be only on that rare occasion of an emergency that we realize that it is ha been so long since we paid attention to the instructions that we now have a very vague idea of what to do.

Many businesses will have a company policy, code of conduct and operations manual and include training. When a new employee starts with a company there is often some kind of onboarding process that includes either training sessions or handing over a policies and procedures manual or a combination of the two. In addition to sharing with the employee how the employee should go about doing their job, the training and manuals should also include what should be done when things go awry. These instructions should be clear, and employees must know not only what to do but also who to go to for guidance when things are not right. Employees must also know who to inform and the various levels of leadership that this information should go through. If there is no protocol, an employee will not know who to take a problem to and those who are told may not know what to do with the information. You don’t want to be that company in the news admitting that people noticed an issue early on but that the information did not make its way to the right people to manage it.

In addition to the initial training, companies should remind employees often. This can be performed in-person, in an online session or through other messaging, like posters around the company. It is dangerous and foolish to believe that employees will remember their week of training or the contents of a manual years into employment, especially during the first week at a company an employee is not yet familiar with the day to day workings of that company. When a crisis hits, you don’t want to be the person being told, “You should have known what to do. We told you during your initial training, ten years ago.” You especially don’t want to be the person asking a coworker why they can’t remember that old training – honestly, what do you remember from ten years ago?

Thinking about your business, take steps to:

  • Include in your training, what a person should do when something is wrong, who they should report to and options for anonymous reporting, in case the matter is sensitive, and an employee might fear retaliation for reporting.
  • Make sure that your training is clear and easy to understand and follow up with employees to make sure that they have understood and retained the training.
  • Have a non-retaliation policy at your company, for people who report wrongdoing and errors. This policy must be something your business takes seriously.
  • Have a disaster recovery policy that you revisit and update regularly. Make sure your employees are familiar with the policy so they know what they are responsible for doing.
  • Have important policy information displayed around the office, to remind employees what is expected of them.
  • Perform regular training updates of your employees so that you are not relying on ten-year-old memories.

It takes me only a couple of minutes to get through the safety brochure and some airlines put time and energy into creating engaging and fun pre-flight safety videos that are actually fun to watch. I hope I am never in a flight emergency situation, but I go forward knowing that if that should happen, I shall at least remember to not inflate my lifejacket while still on the plane.

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