Category Archives: NYSSCPA

Three Words for 2018? We Got This!


Over the last week, I have been thinking about 2018. I don’t know about you, but 2018 snuck up on me. One moment I was caught up in the day-to-day of 2017 and the next moment 2018 was just a couple of weeks away! After my initial panic, I thought – well, it’s great because I get to think of my three words. Three words? Well, if you haven’t been on this journey with me before, I shall explain. In 2012, I met and was inspired by Tom Hood and he introduced me to the Three Words approach, which came from Chris Brogan. At the start of every year, now, I sit and think about what three words I would like to guide me through that year. During the year, I come back to those words, to help center, direct and motivate me. Over the last few days, I have thought about how to make this work better for me, and I determined that I must display these words to remind me, even when I am not thinking about being reminded, to move me when I feel stuck and to hold me accountable. I say this in part because, 2017 was a challenging year for me and I found that I often lost track of my guiding lights. Involved in, and sometimes overwhelmed by, the moment, I often forgot to even look for my words. Putting the words everywhere, will go a long way to keeping me mindful of that.

Last year, I started looking back over my year and I have found this to be a great way to assess how things went and to help me set my intentions for 2018. My three words:

Imagine. This is the first word that came to me. During 2017, in part through work and volunteering with the New York State Society of CPAs and the AICPA, I have had some truly new experiences. I have learnt how to play poker and how poker skills can benefit me in the workplace; I have worked with a team to consciously inch towards better health – physically, emotionally, and spiritually – and that has included laughing more and skating in Byrant Park; I have collaborated with incredible people and presented in various spaces, from a national conferences to a college campus. During the year, I have been involved in conversations that have opened my eyes, that have ventured into spaces that are often afraid to even tiptoe into, that have renewed my hope when things have seemed bleak. I have often reminded myself to listen and to hear because that is when I find the moments that hit me hard and that get me to imagine and those moments are incredible. When we imagine, and step outside of what we know, we can find brilliance, we can find understanding and, just as important, we can also see and revise the not so great. In 2018, I want to imagine without fear of where my imagination will lead me. I want to imagine and be okay with when what I imagine doesn’t always work out. I also want to make sure that I make the time and space for my imagination. Back in 2015, I tried to create space for me to be bored, which is a big part of creating the space for imagination and, as the exercise stated, brilliance. It did free my mind in great ways and, looking back and looking at now, I know I need a lot more boredom in my life. And I still haven’t finished my Starry Night jigsaw puzzle!

Innovate. During 2017, I listened and took part in conversations about change. The conversations were about artificial intelligence (AI) about blockchain (and cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin) and about cybersecurity. Other conversations were about what diversity, inclusion, and belonging mean and if and why it is important. We had conversations about what to do about all the change happening in our professions, in our world and in our lives. We talked about how we react to it and how we can embrace, be ahead of and even create greatness out of all the change. Beyond the conversations, we brainstormed and tried new things. We looked at the new approaches other took and ran with them. I spend a lot of time looking at challenges and how, sometimes, people take the same approach to resolving them and see minuscule results. As much as we tout how “change is good”, it is a human thing to resist changing the status quo. During this year, I want to innovate. I want to collaborate and brainstorm and determine to try something new. I want to embrace the difficult conversations, appreciate and improve upon feedback and, on my part, provide truly constructive feedback. I want to remember the power of synergy and never forget that the best innovations come through a community of people sharing, listening and taking risks.

Act. My third word came to me after I wrote and thought about my 2017 look back. When it comes to training, I have established and go with what gets me to success. If I have a race, I print up a daily timetable that includes rest days, cross training days and exactly what I shall do on each day (distance, goals, tempos if needed). The night before every training, I put out exactly what I am going to wear on the day and I determine my route. I think about and take away all my excuses so that, when I wake up, I just do exactly as planned and that gets me a step closer to where I need to go. I keep my schedule on the wall and tick off each day as I go along. During 2017, I often did not apply this approach. As a result, especially where I felt the stakes were high, I became adept at getting cold feet, at second-guessing myself and at putting things off until I decided it was too late to do them. There are many reasons why this happened but knowing the reasons and doing nothing about them is not helpful. I am going to do more acting in 2018. To help me do this, I am going to find the ways to take away my excuses, and I am also going to be more realistic about what I can get done, so that I don’t end up doing many things in a mediocre manner that only serves to disappoint me and others. I also must remember to be kinder to myself when I act and to see the power in action. I must remember that it is through action that I can bring value and have impact.

Before diving into 2018, I want to take a moment and meditate upon my previous three words:

2013 – Change, Discover & Motivate
2014 – Transform, Pursue & Collaborate
2015 – Receptive, Synergy & Service
2016 – Learn Fear & Community
2017 – Embrace, Persevere & Monchu

Several years ago, I went to Hawaii with friends and decided to take surfing lessons. I was a couple of months out of surgery and hesitated before I went out – I wasn’t at full strength, everyone else was going on a fun outing and I would be doing this solo, as no one else was interested. But, I had been thinking about taking a surfing lesson and I had told my surfing neighbor (who ultimately became my husband) that I was going to take a lesson and that made me feel accountable. During the lesson, I fell countless times, I scraped my knee and sometimes even got to the point where I was able to ride a wave while kneeling on the board. Then, I stood, and rode, and didn’t fall off. It was glorious and totally worth every fall, and the skin missing from my leg. When I finally fell off the board, I rose out of the water with a victorious yell! It is this that I must remember – it is a journey but it can only happen if I Imagine, Innovate AND Act.

Happy and wordy 2018 to you! Please share with me – what are your words for 2018?

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Fare Thee Well!


“2017 was an intense year”. That’s the news alert that I received on 26 December. You’re not kidding me! – that was my response. This year has been a more challenging year than I expected it to be. Last year, I decided to do a year in review. Looking back helped me think more about my plans for the future. I have decided to do the same thing again. It is important to take stock. Without that, how can one think about the future?

As the year began, I decided to deal with minor health issues that turned out to be way more tedious and drawn out than I ever expected. Something that I thought would not take much time at all ended up lasting through July. What a drag. A trip that my husband and I had been planning, to visit my grandmother, was postponed. Then, on 10 June, my grandmother passed away. It was devastating news and made more so because, being in the midst of my own treatments, I could not travel for her funeral. The silver lining in this was that I discovered something I had never known. My family in Zimbabwe shared the above photo and I was stunned to see just how much I look like my grandmother.

Despite the challenges that came with the new year, I was honored and excited to be an instrumental part of a new committee with the New York State Society of CPAs – the Diversity & Inclusion Committee. It has been an eye-opening and insightful year, working to provide programming to our members to improve diversity & inclusion in our profession and to have frank and enlightening discussions and events around the topic. I have had fun times with members and those who have attended events and I like to think that, one little step at a time, we are making progress.

I have continued with the cello lessons that I started a year ago. I have woken up on Saturday mornings, exhausted after a long week at work, drained and not looking forward to the long drive back to downtown Brooklyn and the horror that is looking for a parking spot. However, once I get into class, I find joy. Our cello instructor started an adult orchestra and I have already had two recitals. A year ago I was learning how to play “Twinkle, Twinkle” and that was an important milestone. A couple of weeks ago, our orchestra played the theme to Jurassic Park AND I played a solo!! I’m no Yo-yo Ma (and never plan to be) but I always welcome the opportunity to work my brain and heart in new ways. I believe it makes me a better person, a happier person and a much better CPA!

I have continued to be inspired by high school and college students. These interactions renew my energy to work to build the pipeline to our profession – there is so much incredible talent out there and some of that talent should be a part of our profession. I speak with young people who are full of passion and promise and it fills me with joy!

I spoke at the AICPA’s Forensic & Valuation Services Conference. I met an incredible range of fellow professionals and came away feeling as though my brain had expanded a little bit. Every year, I look forward to sharing thoughts and insights and learning from Forensic & Valuation professionals and this year did not disappoint.

During the year, something I struggled to do was run. A couple of years ago, while taking out the trash, I tripped over a concrete block in my parking lot and fell, hard. I fell hard enough to fracture my leg and spent several months in a brace. As I failed to make a comeback, I went to see a doctor and found out that I had a torn meniscus. I closed out the year a procedure to fix the meniscus. That is all sorted out, but it turns out that, through that fall, where I wasn’t even running away from a rabid raccoon, I managed to do more damage to my knee that may need to be sorted out. The sad part of this is that I have been told to give up running. Honestly, I was gutted. Running has become a large part of who I am. My runs are my quiet time, they are my meditation and my medication. I have run through a Times Square that is cleared of traffic and pretended that I am trying to escape zombies. I have run through all five boroughs of New York City, during the marathon, and found delight and strength from those lining the route. To be told, “no more” is a difficult thing to swallow. I keep faith that I shall find new adventures and hold the secret (not so much now) hope in my heart that I shall run again.

  • I skated in Bryant Park and even let go of the railing!
  • I spent time with friends and family at the beach (I live here now!)
  • I went to an interactive screening of The Big Lebowski. There were a lot of bathrobes and even more spandex.
  • I have met new people who have made my life better.
  • I continue to be extremely grateful for all those I have known, who have given me hope, joy and support, sometimes even when they don’t realize they are doing so.

Yes, 2017 was a year with pain and disappointment but 2017 was also a year of inspiration and joy and it is important to see the progress that we have made, the work that has been done and the relationships that have been formed and built upon. I am ready for next year because I know I have great things to carry forward with me.

It is two days before 2018 – a year that will bring the Winter Olympics and the FIFA World Cup! I already have three words for 2018 – Bring It On!!!

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Paying It Way Forward


Bert N. Mitchell

Last night I attended the New York State Society of CPA’s (NYSSCPA) Moynihan Fund Gala. I was looking forward to a fun night with my colleagues, looking out on the water as the sun set and enjoying good food and drinks. What I did not expect was the incredible history lesson that I received from Lifetime Award Honoree, Bert N. Mitchell. In 1987, Mitchell became the first black president of the NYSSCPA and, during his tenure, the NYSSCPA launched the Career Opportunities in the Accounting Profession (COAP) program. I was already aware of these very impressive aspects of Bert Mitchell’s career, but, as he shared his life story, I found that these achievements were only scratching the surface.

Mitchell shared, last night, that he was the 100th black CPA in the United States. This statistic hit harder when he shared that he earned this qualification in 1965, a little more than ten years after Bernadine Coles Gines became the first black woman to become a CPA in New York and the 34th black person to become a CPA in America. Even though it was 11 years after Gines had encountered many obstacles on her journey to becoming a CPA, Mitchell did not find things to be much easier when he graduated, at the top of his accounting class, in 1963. Despite his top-notch qualifications, Mitchell spent two weeks seeking a position at one of the top accounting firms, preferably, one of the Big 8 (at the time). He travelled from lower Manhattan and worked his way to Midtown, stopping in at every major CPA firm and, over and over again, he was turned away, with the excuse that their clients’ attitudes regarding hiring a black person were why they wouldn’t give him a job. In 1968, the AICPA launched the Committee on Recruitment from Minority Groups and Mitchell was one of the five black members of the eleven member committee. A year later, in 1969, Mitchell published a study entitled “The Black Minority in the CPA Profession” and this study found that underrepresentation in the CPA profession was worse than in law, medicine and other professions. This study found that out of 100,000 CPAs in the United States, fewer than 150 were black and firms claimed, as they had to Mitchell when he was seeking employment, that the barrier to hiring African Americans was not their own bias but that of their clients.

In a follow-up to the 1969 study, Mitchell published a study in 1975 that showed that the number of black CPAs had tripled to 450. As encouraging as this information was, there was still much to and, as became apparent, Mitchell was nowhere near done. When Mitchell became president of the NYSSCPA in 1987, the stats were depressing. Black people made up almost 13% of the population, yet they made up less than one percent of CPAs. In comparison to other professions, only airline pilots had lower representation. Representation by other peoples of color was not much better – Latino representation also hovered around 1% and Asian representation was about 3%.

When I heard Bert Mitchell’s speech last night, I knew I needed to know more and when he mentioned that he was the 100th black CPA in America I, fortunately, knew exactly where to go. When I met and was moved and inspired by Bernadine Coles Gines, I went out and bought the book “A White-Collar Profession, African American Certified Public Accountants Since 1921” by Theresa A. Hammond. This book, published in 2002, tells the history of African Americans in the profession. I knew I would find him in there, not only because of the incredible work that he has done to expose people of color to the CPA profession, but also because I remembered that the book included a list of the first 100 black CPAs in the United States. I got home and there he was – “100. Bert N. Mitchell 1965 New York”.

At the Gala, as three alumni of the COAP program took to the stage and shared their stories of how the program and not only exposed them to the CPA profession but also made them believe that this was possible for them, I was deeply moved by the work and efforts of Bert N. Mitchell and others who, like him, have been dedicated to diversity and inclusion in our profession. Pick up the book, read it and learn more about Mitchell and the other first 100. This is not ancient history, it is actually amazing how recent this history is. It is hard to pass the CPA exam. It is a daily challenge to maintain the standards and knowledge that make us trusted professionals. It should never be a struggle to be hired because of your race, gender or sexual orientation. I am truly in awe, as Bert N. Mitchell, truly has dedicated his life to advocating for diversity and fairness in the profession.

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But Wait… There’s More. Get Up Close

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True Tone at the Top



I am reading “Tragedy of Fraud – Insider Trading Edition“, a book recently released by James Ulvog. This is the story of Scott London‘s journey from KPMG partner to prison inmate. James Ulvog covered this story in depth, from the moment it broke up to when Scott London went to prison. I would not be surprised if Jim picks up the story again when London is released from prison. In the book, Jim has spoken about the possible consequences of London’s crime and a lot of these stretch well into the future, potentially affecting him both professionally and personally. It is always a big disappointment when members of the CPA profession completely disregard the ethical and professional standards that have been set by the various governing boards. It is, therefore, important when people like Jim of Attestation Update and Francine McKenna of re: The Auditors
call out the CPAs who are setting a terrible tone at the top of their profession.

It is equally important, if not more so, to recognize those who have provided a positive contribution to the CPA profession. We are trusted professionals for a reason; it’s not just empty rhetoric. A little over a week ago, I had the indescribable privilege of meeting Bernadine Coles Gines, CPA. I am pretty sure this is not a name you have heard before, but she is a woman worth learning more about. I met her at a New York State Society of CPAs (NYSSCPA) ceremony honoring the 60th anniversary of Bernadine Coles Gines’ CPA license. This is a big deal because Gines was the first black woman to receive the CPA license in New York State. It becomes even more of a big deal when you learn more about the challenges she faced, both while working towards becoming a CPA and beyond.

Bernadine Coles Gines moved to New York City from Virginia, where she is originally from, to get her master’s degree at New York University. She moved because, at the time, Virginia’s segregation laws kept her out of graduate school in that state. Once Gines had graduated and passed her CPA exams, she looked for work. She found that she could not find work with a black CPA firm in New York City because they would not hire women. She also found that she could not find work with white CPA firms because they would not hire black people. While interviewing at a white firm, one partner told her that, even though he could not hire her, perhaps Gines could help his wife, who was looking for a maid. She was finally hired by a two-partner Jewish firm, but only after she had convinced them that she was not a communist. Of course, getting work was in no way the end of her challenges but at no time did Gines give up or compromise. She persevered and continued to work toward achieving her goals, despite (or perhaps more resolved, because of) the challenges in her way.

I read a little about Bernadine Coles Gines before I met her, but when I met her, I was even more impressed. She spoke of her principles and her determination and her story is living proof of both. To come to face to face with a person who epitomizes unwavering grit and the drive to stand by what she believes in is truly motivating. To learn about people like Bernadine Gines reminds us about the types of people who have made CPA the trusted professionals that they are and they also show why we harshly judge those who give us a bad name. They are a reminder to us and to those we serve of those of us who are professional, ethical and will stand strong, despite the pressures put upon us.

You should go out and learn more about Bernadine Gines and others like her. As though her achievements were not enough, she shared during her interview, that her sister, Ruth Coles Harris, was the first Black woman to be certified as a CPA in Virginia, in 1963. Ruth Coles Harris faced challenges of her own when she decided she wanted to be a CPA. I wonder what those family reunions are like – I would hate to be the black sheep in that family (if they even have one). I am truly fortunate that I had this incredible opportunity to meet Bernadine Coles Gines and that I was reminded how important it is to uphold ethics and principles and that I should not compromise, especially when things are very challenging.

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Hear Ye, Hear Ye! It’s The Future!


Toward the end of June, I went into the New York State Society of CPAs offices (very lovely offices, I must say) to be part of a roundtable discussion on the future of the accounting profession. The discussion was distilled into a piece in August’s CPA Journal. Personal interest aside, it is a great read with a diversity of opinions on various issues regarding the CPA profession and the value of the designation. Along with me were three other professionals, all with different career paths within the designation of CPA. Somya Munjal is the founder of CPA for the People, which is a CPA services, business consulting and social venture firm. She is also the founder of Youthful Savings, whose mission is “empowering the next generation with financial education and entrepreneurship training”. Michael Durant is working on his master’s degree in taxation, while pursuing his CPA designation. That’s right, a master’s in taxation; that should begin to convey just how complicated taxation can be. Michael is also the cochairman of the advisory board for the Bronx School of Law and Finance, a school that he is an alumnus of. Jordan Frey is a senior account in EisnerAmper’s private business services group. As you can see on the company’s website, the group provides a wide range of services to businesses of all types and sizes. And then there is me – figuring financial forensics. So, in a room of four CPAs, you have a tax man, a social venture, financial education and entrepreneurship training guru, a private business services expert and a forensic accountant. Walking into the room, I was encouraged to find that I was in a room with people who validate my claims about the variety of professional paths that a CPA can take. It’s always a good feeling when your claims are validated.

We had a very interesting discussion about the different directions in which our CPA designation was taking us and, for all the differences in career we had, we had some real similarities. We were drawn by the high standards and ethics that are integral to being a CPA. I have written about how a CPA is considered to be a trusted professional, a characteristic that is an asset in someone you are dealing with when it comes to financial matters. I am happy to find that I am not alone. It is one thing for me to stand on my soap box and wax lyrical about the virtues of the CPA; it is completely something else, in a very good way, to be in a room with others who feel as passionately as I do about what we do.

I am sharing our conversations with you and, if you feel as though reading The CPA Journal diminishes your street cred, you can throw in a little Wu Tang Clan as your backing track, as you read a little bit about the future…

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