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Three Words for 2018? We Got This!


Over the last week, I have been thinking about 2018. I don’t know about you, but 2018 snuck up on me. One moment I was caught up in the day-to-day of 2017 and the next moment 2018 was just a couple of weeks away! After my initial panic, I thought – well, it’s great because I get to think of my three words. Three words? Well, if you haven’t been on this journey with me before, I shall explain. In 2012, I met and was inspired by Tom Hood and he introduced me to the Three Words approach, which came from Chris Brogan. At the start of every year, now, I sit and think about what three words I would like to guide me through that year. During the year, I come back to those words, to help center, direct and motivate me. Over the last few days, I have thought about how to make this work better for me, and I determined that I must display these words to remind me, even when I am not thinking about being reminded, to move me when I feel stuck and to hold me accountable. I say this in part because, 2017 was a challenging year for me and I found that I often lost track of my guiding lights. Involved in, and sometimes overwhelmed by, the moment, I often forgot to even look for my words. Putting the words everywhere, will go a long way to keeping me mindful of that.

Last year, I started looking back over my year and I have found this to be a great way to assess how things went and to help me set my intentions for 2018. My three words:

Imagine. This is the first word that came to me. During 2017, in part through work and volunteering with the New York State Society of CPAs and the AICPA, I have had some truly new experiences. I have learnt how to play poker and how poker skills can benefit me in the workplace; I have worked with a team to consciously inch towards better health – physically, emotionally, and spiritually – and that has included laughing more and skating in Byrant Park; I have collaborated with incredible people and presented in various spaces, from a national conferences to a college campus. During the year, I have been involved in conversations that have opened my eyes, that have ventured into spaces that are often afraid to even tiptoe into, that have renewed my hope when things have seemed bleak. I have often reminded myself to listen and to hear because that is when I find the moments that hit me hard and that get me to imagine and those moments are incredible. When we imagine, and step outside of what we know, we can find brilliance, we can find understanding and, just as important, we can also see and revise the not so great. In 2018, I want to imagine without fear of where my imagination will lead me. I want to imagine and be okay with when what I imagine doesn’t always work out. I also want to make sure that I make the time and space for my imagination. Back in 2015, I tried to create space for me to be bored, which is a big part of creating the space for imagination and, as the exercise stated, brilliance. It did free my mind in great ways and, looking back and looking at now, I know I need a lot more boredom in my life. And I still haven’t finished my Starry Night jigsaw puzzle!

Innovate. During 2017, I listened and took part in conversations about change. The conversations were about artificial intelligence (AI) about blockchain (and cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin) and about cybersecurity. Other conversations were about what diversity, inclusion, and belonging mean and if and why it is important. We had conversations about what to do about all the change happening in our professions, in our world and in our lives. We talked about how we react to it and how we can embrace, be ahead of and even create greatness out of all the change. Beyond the conversations, we brainstormed and tried new things. We looked at the new approaches other took and ran with them. I spend a lot of time looking at challenges and how, sometimes, people take the same approach to resolving them and see minuscule results. As much as we tout how “change is good”, it is a human thing to resist changing the status quo. During this year, I want to innovate. I want to collaborate and brainstorm and determine to try something new. I want to embrace the difficult conversations, appreciate and improve upon feedback and, on my part, provide truly constructive feedback. I want to remember the power of synergy and never forget that the best innovations come through a community of people sharing, listening and taking risks.

Act. My third word came to me after I wrote and thought about my 2017 look back. When it comes to training, I have established and go with what gets me to success. If I have a race, I print up a daily timetable that includes rest days, cross training days and exactly what I shall do on each day (distance, goals, tempos if needed). The night before every training, I put out exactly what I am going to wear on the day and I determine my route. I think about and take away all my excuses so that, when I wake up, I just do exactly as planned and that gets me a step closer to where I need to go. I keep my schedule on the wall and tick off each day as I go along. During 2017, I often did not apply this approach. As a result, especially where I felt the stakes were high, I became adept at getting cold feet, at second-guessing myself and at putting things off until I decided it was too late to do them. There are many reasons why this happened but knowing the reasons and doing nothing about them is not helpful. I am going to do more acting in 2018. To help me do this, I am going to find the ways to take away my excuses, and I am also going to be more realistic about what I can get done, so that I don’t end up doing many things in a mediocre manner that only serves to disappoint me and others. I also must remember to be kinder to myself when I act and to see the power in action. I must remember that it is through action that I can bring value and have impact.

Before diving into 2018, I want to take a moment and meditate upon my previous three words:

2013 – Change, Discover & Motivate
2014 – Transform, Pursue & Collaborate
2015 – Receptive, Synergy & Service
2016 – Learn Fear & Community
2017 – Embrace, Persevere & Monchu

Several years ago, I went to Hawaii with friends and decided to take surfing lessons. I was a couple of months out of surgery and hesitated before I went out – I wasn’t at full strength, everyone else was going on a fun outing and I would be doing this solo, as no one else was interested. But, I had been thinking about taking a surfing lesson and I had told my surfing neighbor (who ultimately became my husband) that I was going to take a lesson and that made me feel accountable. During the lesson, I fell countless times, I scraped my knee and sometimes even got to the point where I was able to ride a wave while kneeling on the board. Then, I stood, and rode, and didn’t fall off. It was glorious and totally worth every fall, and the skin missing from my leg. When I finally fell off the board, I rose out of the water with a victorious yell! It is this that I must remember – it is a journey but it can only happen if I Imagine, Innovate AND Act.

Happy and wordy 2018 to you! Please share with me – what are your words for 2018?

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Things Fall Apart


Divorce. Just about nobody wants to deal with that. However, just about everybody knows that, in order to best navigate what can be a rather complicated process, if they are getting divorced, they should get a lawyer. How many think – I should probably get an accountant too? That’s right – an accountant. During a marriage, couples will acquire property, share incomes and perhaps even have children. Should they split, it is almost never a simple matter of just walking away. There may be a home (or homes) to consider, issues of child and spousal support and other financial assets that will be taken by one or the other spouse. These many financial aspects to divorce  can be very challenging to resolve, and this is where the services of a forensic accountant can be well utilized.

The services can be as straightforward as preparing a spouse’s statement of net worth.  The forensic CPA’s understanding of and experience with financial statements and tax return documents will help make this process more efficient, and less likely to contain errors, than trying to prepare the statement yourself. Trying to correct net worth numbers after a divorce is finalized is a huge headache that most would probably want to do without. The need for the specialized skills and qualifications of a forensic CPA  come into play when a divorce involves more substantial and complicated assets. During a marriage couples may accumulate property, own and operate businesses, or incur debts. Forensic accountants will investigate the locations, value and character of the assets and income of the divorcing couple and present this financial information and testimony in court.

The location of assets and income is simple enough concept. Sometimes a divorcing spouse who wishes to minimize alimony or child support payments may try to hide their true income. Especially when the spouse is self-employed or has various sources of income, a forensic accountant may need to use various methods to trace and recalculate hidden income. In addition to tracing hidden income, a forensic account will assess the current value of property and other non-cash assets. What also comes into play in a divorce proceeding is the character of the property and debts. Where a divorcing couple resides decides to a large extent whether property will be viewed as community, equitable or separate. A state’s marital, financial and tax laws determine how the marital estate will be divided, how spousal and child support will be calculated and it is, therefore, very important that a divorcing party engages experienced divorce attorneys and forensic accountants who are experienced in family law.

For instance, when a couple has been married for many years, trying to determine the character of an asset can be a challenge. A forensic accountant may be needed to trace that asset back many years, and possibly through various investments, to figure out the source of the original funds used to purchase the assets. Sometimes separate property has been mixed with community property (which is completely understandable as most believe their marriage will be permanent). In these cases, it is important to have a professional who can use acceptable methods to identify the different types of property to a level that is acceptable in a court of law. Things can get really complicated. For example:

  • What if one spouse comes to the marriage with separate property which carries debt. During the marriage payments on this property. Are those payments made with separate or community funds? Will that change the character of the property as a whole, or in part or not at all?
  • What about if one spouse comes to the marriage with a business that she or he works in during the marriage. At the time of the divorce, can the other spouse claim a part of the increase in value of the business? How could their contribution be assessed if at all?

Using presiding laws and their expertise, forensic accountants work to provide the evidence and calculations that the judge will use to come to conclusions about the apportionment of assets and income.

Another way in which the skills of a forensic accountant are used are during the discovery phase. This is the part of the divorce process where the lawyers gather information, documents and other evidence that they will then use to resolve the case. Discovery involves requesting and collecting documents, asking questions of various parties that must be answered, under oath, in either written form or in the presence of a court stenographer, issuing subpoenas, and asking the opposing party to admit that items on a list of statements are true. Credentialed forensic accountants are very important during discovery as they can help the attorneys draft documents, analyze and assess whether or not documents received are reliable and useful. They can help the lawyers put together the lists of the documents that they should request from the opposing parties.

The stress of dealing with a divorce can be better managed by engaging the services of a qualified professional who has an understanding of

  • tax issues,
  • financial statements,
  • tracing financial transactions,
  • analyzing the value and character of assets and liabilities, and
  • understanding the machinations of the local legal system.

Together with your lawyer, should you have to go through a divorce, a certified and experienced forensic accountant can help make the process less of a drama.

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Step Away From The Dice


I just spent a lovely weekend in Atlantic City, celebrating a friend’s birthday. During this time I ran past several casinos, I walked through a casino but, happily, I did not spend any time at all gambling at the casino. I say happily because I am a terrible gambler. The mere thought of gambling fills me with anxiety because I have no idea what I’m doing out there. The only thing I do know is that the odds are stacked against me, more so because I don’t know what I am doing. I never learned how to play poker, beyond yelling “big money, big money” I don’t know the rules of roulette and even when sitting in front of a one-armed bandit, I am pretty sure that I am not quite doing it correctly.  The one thing I do know, when I am in a casino, is who to NOT consult for help. The pit manager. Because the allegiance of pit managers is to the casino so I know that helping me win money is not a priority for them. In fact, in order for the pit managers to keep working, we the gamblers need to lose more than we win.

This brought to mind an article I read about Philip Ramatlhware who walked into a Philadelphia Citibank branch to open a regular bank account where he could deposit the proceeds from a settlement with Greyhound. He had been injured in a bus accident and received $225,000 and wanted to keep his money safe. All he wanted was a savings account but he was referred to a broker who assured Mr. Ramatlhware, a man with limited English skills and without a college education, that his money was going into “guaranteed” funds. Instead, in less than six months, he lost $40,000. This is not an isolated case. Digging into the archives of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), which is an independent regulator of security firms doing business with the public, you can find several cases where individuals walked into commercial banks, seeking a safe, FDIC insured place to put their savings and ended up losing money through risky investments that they could not understand. That they could not understand the risky investments was not only because these investments were complex ones but also because the brokers they met with misrepresented the risks involved and was not clear about where the money was going. It is, to a certain extent, understandable that these customers were easily misled – they believed they were going to a commercial bank and not an investment bank.

Back in 1933, the Banking Act of 1933 was enacted and it included four provisions that are what is generally meant when people speak of  the Glass-Steagall Act. The provisions served to, in essence, separate commercial banking and investment banking. They kept commercial banks from dealing in securities for their customers. The funds that customers deposited into commercial banks, as I mentioned before, were insured by the FDIC and were not to be used for speculation. They were to be considered safe by the banks’ customers. Conversely, risk-taking investment banks were not to take in deposits. So, you may be wondering how, with Glass-Steagall in effect, Mr. Ramtlhware and walked into a commercial bank and ended up investing with an investment bank broker. This is because Glass-Steagall was repealed in 1999, leaving banks able to deal in both commercial and investment banking at the same time. This means that investments that are complicated and very risky and should be reserved for so-called sophisticated investors are being marketed and sold to people who think they are dealing with the relatively safe offerings of a commercial bank, do not fully comprehend what they are getting into and who generally cannot afford to lose the money they end up investing in risky offerings.

As long as the wall between commercial and investment banks continues to be virtually non-existent, potential customers walking into commercial banks are going to have to start asking more questions at the bank:

  • Is my deposit insured by the FDIC?
  • Are you a broker?
  • If I am just depositing money into a risk-free guaranteed account, why does it come with all of this complicated paperwork?

Should you find that you have been taken for a ride by your bank, know that you have resources you can turn to in order to have your case heard. FINRA offers advice to investors that probably will not turn you into a sophisticated investor but may go a long to helping you recognize some of the strategies an unscrupulous broker may employ. Also you can take your case to FINRA or, in the case of fraud, the Department of Justice. Though you may believe that you are walking into a commercial bank and dealing with a customer service representative who wants to help you, you should be careful in the banks for sometimes you may come across a pit manager who is trying to make as much money as possible for the investment bank casino.

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