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Inspiration My Two Cents

Changing Things Up

Photo by Mark König on Unsplash

In March 2018, I was knocked to my knees when Linda, my closest friend, passed away suddenly, while heading home from a vacation. Eleven months later, in February 2019, I was flattened when my little sister, Veneka, passed away, equally unexpectedly. You know how it feels when you are knocked to the ground, and that monster is still sitting on your chest, and someone yells to you to get up. The struggle to standing can take all the energy that you have. You push that monster off of you and, even as you stand, that monster still lurks beside you, trying often to knock you over again. What energy I had left I focused on the functional necessities but I did not have energy for much else. My writing did not fare well. Often I would think about things but, as I do not yet possess the ability to have my thoughts magically transform into writing on a page, there have been many blank pages in my life these last few years.

Though my fingers have been less active, I have had no shortage of thoughts and, when I think, it is about a lot more than financial forensics. When I talk, it is about more than financial forensics. When I act, I do more than financial forensics. So, now when I write, I want to write about more than financial forensics. I have found that, at the core of my thoughts, my conversations, and my actions are the same principles. I want to keep doing that in this space, so we can explore how things like accountability, ethics, and systems are important in various parts of our lives and our work.

I believe that this sharing and these conversations we have, in our small spaces and in our small ways, can indeed alter the face of the world. I am getting out of my head a little bit to share the wisdom I find and to hear the wisdom from you. In this small space of a site, this is a big change so I am, as is human, nervous. However, to quote Babe Ruth, “Never let the fear of striking out keep you from coming up to bat.” And this is where my baseball analogies will stop before I am outed as someone who grew up on rounders and then cricket, before baseball.

I’m up to bat!

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Inspiration My Two Cents

2017! Three Words! Let’s Go!

img_1043-2Yesterday, I took a moment to look back at 2016 and I am glad that I did. After that exercise in honoring history, I actually changed one of my words for 2017. My words for 2017? That may be what you are wondering. Let me explain. In 2013, Tom Hood introduced me to the concept of Three Words (and that concept came from Chris Brogan). I use these three words to give the year ahead a theme, almost like a rhythm that I can dance to as I go through the year; and isn’t everything better with dance? The process of thinking about my three words and then coming back to them throughout the year, help consolidate, direct and give confidence to what I do and how I do it. As I read over yesterday’s post, I saw my 2016 Three Words dancing over my year, in ways that I had not thought about as I was writing the post – Learn. Fear. Community.

For several days, I thought about what my words for 2017 would be – and how those words would serve to seal my intentions for the days ahead. I think I have it now.

Embrace: In previous years I have written about changing things in my life. Transform was one of my words in 2014. Then, in 2015, Receptive was a word of mine. Last year we moved to a new neighborhood. When I was a kid, due to politics and other adventures in their lives, we moved around a lot. Between first and third grade, I went to four different schools in three different countries, in four different cities. During my first two years in New York City, I lost count of how many places I lived in. I even spent a couple of months camping out on a (very amazing) friend’s couch on weekends, while I worked in Florida during the week. Last year, I talked transformation and I was receptive to talk of moving but, now that I am here, I realize that it is not going to work until I embrace it. This is where I am now with my move, with my work, with my life. I can talk about how great innovations in my line of work are; I can marvel at how awesome some of the tools that are available to us are; I can wax lyrical about the incredible people who cross my path and make me better at what I do, but all of that is not worth much unless I dive in there, snuggle in and just embrace it all.

Persevere: When I started training to run long distance, I learnt about the power of a mantra. The mantra was invaluable to me, when doing hill repeats. I would chug up a hill and repeat, over and over again, “I love hills.” I will say this, I reached the top of that hill and many others AND I hate hills less and appreciate their value. I actually surprised myself when I told a cousin that I wished there were a few more hills around my new home. In 2015, I embarked on a new journey of sorts. I started my own business and decided that I wanted to do work that made me look forward to getting out of bed every day. I loved that my husband’s work, as a photographer, was something he also did for fun. I admired how excited he got about his projects and I wanted some of that. At times I would talk to some people about what I wanted to do and how I wanted to do it and they would tell me, “that will never work.” Fortunately, my incredible community (2016 word, hello!) took over and repeated the mantra I had not yet learnt to say myself. However, as the year came to an end, I started to believe. So this year, I shall remember to say to myself, “You got this. You can do this,” not just when I am running, or doing pull-ups. I shall tell myself this as I am serving my clients, community and the public.

Monchu: My last word is a word that I have borrowed from Chris Brogan. Chris tells us Monchu is an Okinawan word that means “one family”. It essentially means that we treat people who are not our blood as though they are family. I have benefited from this concept forever. As someone who lives very far away from most of my blood, I just don’t know where I would be with my one family. For instance, I just wrote about how I was able to crash on a friend’s couch when I first moved to New York. I didn’t mention that I had only known her for months and she offered her home to me, and her husband and adorable daughter didn’t seem to mind either. That is just one of a million of my stories. I know that I could do a way better job of keeping in touch with people to let them know that they are part of my one family. I know that this philosophy will guide me to be better at what I do and how I do it. I hope to also inspire others around me to embrace this philosophy.

As I share my words for 2017, I want to acknowledge my words from previous years:

2013 – Change, Discover & Motivate
2014 – Transform, Pursue & Collaborate
2015 – Receptive, Synergy & Service
2016 – Learn, Fear & Community

And now for 2017 – Embrace, Persevere & Monchu. I am excited for the year ahead and I know that the view from my new home will help me do so. You see it up above, I can see forever now. I got this.

Tell me, what are your words?

I hope 2017 is your best year ever!

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Inspiration My Two Cents

2016! Three Words! Boom!

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Hey there 2016! In 2013, I officially put aside New Year’s Resolutions. This is because I was introduced to the concept of Three Words, by Tom Hood, who found this idea from Chris Brogan. I have found the three words to be a great way to give my year a point of consolidation and mindfulness. I have found the three words to be invaluable. I find myself bringing up these words in conversations and in my writing and I am sure I must sound like a broken record to some people. I am happy to be a broken record if this helps me live a life of greater focus and productivity. I am just about always trying to do too much and I have found these three words give me greater direction.

Last year, my three words were Receptive, Synergy and Service and I found these words coming up often during 2015. I faced several challenges during the year, I embarked on new ventures and my life took turns that I never imagined. During that time, my words from 2013 all the way through 2015 helped form my rallying cry.

As 2015 neared its end, I wondered what my words for 2016 would be. I took the time to look back and think about where I have been and then think forward to where I would like to go and what I want my compass to look like as I travel. Today, I have my words for 2016.

Learn: During my various adventures in 2015, I things thrown at me that I could either try to ignore or take lessons from. My brother got married and that brought a lot of my family together in one place. It is always amazing to me that, for as much as I think I know the stories of my family, when we come together there are new and incredibly interesting things that I learn. My husband and I also spent time together with his aunt where she regaled us with stories of her youth and his family history. As much as I think I know, I find that there are still more ways to expand my mind and that should I choose to, I can keep on learning. I hope to learn in formal settings, in informal setting and totally by surprise.

Fear: I am sure that at some point in my writing I have shared my irrational fear of rodents, a fear that is not very helpful for a person who lives in New York City. I remember once, years ago, I was living in an apartment an old building. The old buildings in New York are lovely to look at but come with holes, holes that mice like to climb through, especially when it gets cold. One evening, I was hanging out on the couch when suddenly a mouse scuttled across my floor. I was frozen on the couch, afraid to move lest the mouse and I collide. People tell me that the rodents are more afraid of me than I am of them; I beg to differ. I ended up calling my neighbor, from the couch and, luckily he came by and dealt with the mouse. Now, I am not about to dive into a close encounter with a rodent, but I am learning that the times that I have been able to get past my fears are the times that I have been able to have new adventures. I started my own business this year and I am learning to not let my fears about failure, about the unknown or about anything else hold me back. I am also having a great time exploring life and learning new things about myself and those around me.

Community: I say it all the time and it remains true – nothing happens without community. When I started my business I found support from friends, family and colleagues. I found support from strangers. Had I realized the power of community, I may have taken the leap earlier. An instrumental aspect of collaboration and synergy is community. As I continue on this incredible adventure, I want to be mindful of the great things that can be achieved by a community.

Just a moment to look back on my words from prior years:

2013 – Change, Discover and Motivate
2014 – Transform, Pursue and Collaborate
2015 – Receptive, Synergy and Service

And now: Learn, Fear and Community

I am unbelievably excited at the prospect of looking fear in the eye and saying, “bring it on.”. For it is through these experiences that I shall learn and it is with these moments that I shall be able to connect with my community and build that community. AND I have an extra day to do all of this this year. So, tell me, what are your words?

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In The News My Two Cents What's Going On?

Not Again…

I don’t know what life was like for you, growing up, but my youth was full of lectures. I never just got into trouble. I got into trouble AND I got a lecture to go along with it. We never just went on vacation; we went on vacation, had to write an essay about our experiences AND we got a lecture about how both things were important. We didn’t just discuss our report cards, good or bad; we discussed our report cards AND got a lecture about the long-term benefits of each class we were taking. The lectures often came with true-life stories about one or both of my parents, someone they knew or someone who lived in their “day”. I am not saying that I was lectured a lot, but I did hear some stories more than once. On the occasions that I tried to interrupt to say that I had heard the story, I was told either that there was a new lesson to be learned, or asked why, if I knew the story and the wisdom it imparted, I continued to make the same mistakes.

Well, at last, I get it. Because the other day, I came across a case that includes so many lessons on fraud that, if I were teaching a semester on fraud, I could use it as an example in just about every lesson. This is the case of Christopher Myles, a former bookkeeper in New York City. He worked at Central Park Realty Holding Corp., and some of its affiliates, and reported to the President of the company. Tragically, in May 2010, the President, suffered a stroke and ended up in “a comatose-like state until her death in February 2012”.

With the president incapacitated, no one stepped in to VERIFY Myles’ work. By the time September 2011 rolled around, Christopher was aware that he could pretty much do whatever he wanted without anyone really questioning what was going on. He knew that he now had the OPPORTUNITY to defraud his employer and he took advantage of this opportunity. True to the trend, Christopher Myles started his fraud on a small scale, using the President’s credit cards to pay for personal expenses. He escalated quickly and by early 2012, he was transferring funds out of her personal bank account in order to pay his and his mother’s bills. He did this until there was no longer any money in the President’s bank account. Myles did not let this empty bank account stop him though; he then started transferring money from the business accounts, first, into the President’s personal bank account and, subsequently, into his own personal accounts. On days when he felt particularly bold, or reckless, Myles would transfer money straight into his and his mother’s personal bank accounts. Christopher Myles had unfettered access to all of these accounts, both business and personal, and never needed anyone else to sign off on any of the funds he moved into and out of these accounts. The lack of segregation of duties made this fraud simple for Myles.

If anyone had been watching him and taking notice, they may have noticed that Christopher Myles was living beyond his official means. He used his ill-gotten funds to buy a new home, go on shopping sprees and fancy vacations. This is another red flag for possible fraud. Throughout this fraud, created falsified bank statements and recorded all of these illicit transfers as business transfers. Unfortunately, no one followed up closely on any of these untruths. Perhaps none of those looking at the fake bank statements understood how the company worked and what kind expenses would appear as out of character, or maybe no one was familiar with the ledger and how to analyze it. I am not sure, but, the result was that Myles was able to continue his fraud for over two years (just a little bit longer than the median duration of a fraud), until November 2013, when he resigned.

It was only when his replacement discovered the fraudulent invoices that Myles created, in attempt to disguise his embezzlement, that Christopher Myles’ theft was discovered. A forensic investigation revealed that, in two years, Myles had stolen about $1.3 million from his employer. Myles’ former employer reported all of this to the authorities and, in addition to an indictment for the theft, Christopher Myles is also facing tax evasion charges. This is because, in the manner of Al Capone, Christopher Myles did not report any of his fraudulently acquired income on his tax returns.

Almost like a bonus in the lesson that keeps on giving series, once his theft had been exposed, Christopher Myles sent an email to all parties involved. In this email, he RATIONALIZED his fraud, claiming that he was entitled to the funds because he was due a raise and compensation for having to deal with a difficult coworker.

As I read the press release about Christopher Myles’ indictment, my jaw hung open. I said out loud, “wow, this has all the classic markers; it’s unbelievable!” Yet, the markers are classic for a reason. There are probably a lot more lessons to learn from the story of Christopher Myles, but don’t get me started!

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AICPA My Two Cents PSA Where We Are

Checking Up

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Several years ago, I was working on an assignment that had me flying out to Boca Raton, Florida, every Monday and returning to New York City on Friday night. It was great because it was a brutal winter in New York City and pleasantly warm in Boca Raton. It was terrible because it was close to impossible to get anything done over the weekend. One week, I had to admit that there I needed to get one of my teeth looked at. It had been causing me some pain and I knew I had to sort it out before it started hurting a lot. My challenge was to find a dentist who took patients on weekend days and who I could get to easily. I found one online and went in to see him on a Saturday morning. He determined that I needed a filling fixed and he got to work. What I remember about that day is how incredibly painful it was and how unsympathetically the dentist kept ordering me to “be strong”. I was traumatized – so much so that I did not go anywhere near a dentist’s office for years after that. I knew I should, but the memory of the pain and a dentist who was in need of a heart kept me away. Other aspects of my body were very well taken of; I went to my annual physical and that was always a pleasure, compared to my dental disaster. I brushed my teeth but, other than that, they were pretty much on their own.

One nights, I fell asleep while sucking on a throat sweet and, the next morning, I woke up feeling as though my teeth were about to fall out of my head. I was in a panic; I was too young to be toothless. I was desperate and looked up dentists located close to my office. Thankfully, I was able to find a dentist, a few blocks away, who was able to fit me in that very day. As he examined me, a poem from my childhood, “Oh, I Wish I’d Looked After Me Teeth” ran through my head. Fortunately, this time around, I get to keep my teeth. My dentist was a great guy who doesn’t believe in causing pain and suffering and NEVER says to me, “be strong”. I did, however, have to go through a series of appointments to repair the damage that had accumulated over the years that I had avoided the dentist, dentist I could have avoided. I have not missed an appointment since, although I get nervous when the machine turns on, even just to polish my teeth.

Like my teeth, a business needs regular checkups to maintain its financial health. Yes, a lot of companies review their financials on a monthly or quarterly basis, but how many are assessing their control systems and taking steps to update and analyze how they prevent and detect fraud? The fact that the median length of a fraud is 18 months before it is detected and that many frauds can last many years as in the cases of Bernie Madoff and Rita Crundwell, to name a few high profile cases, implies that these steps are not taken often and rigorously enough. No one really thinks that it will happen to them and some people think that their finance department, accountant or auditor will keep them safe from fraud. This is because they do not fully understand the roles and duties of their auditors and accountants. Other people don’t want to spend the money on fraud prevention and detection. However, when you start thinking that Rita Crundwell stole over $54 million and a quick search of the internet brings up many other recent cases of embezzlement of millions of dollars that have been discovered. There are many more that either have not been recorded or are of lesser amounts.

Think about this:

  • Fraud goes on for an average of 18 months but many go on for much longer.
  • Usually fraudsters start out stealing a little money but as times goes on and they are not caught, the amounts stolen grow and grow and grow
  • The knowledge that a company has allowed theft to go on under its nose for years can negatively affect its reputation, leading people to believe that it may not be a safe and ethical place to do business

These are just a few things to think about when it comes to detecting and preventing fraud in your company. It only makes sense to get a qualified Forensic Accountant, Certified in Financial Forensics to assess and evaluate your companies systems in order to beef up your fraud prevention programs and also, perhaps to detect possible fraud? Now, I learnt a very painful lesson before I started to take care of my teeth. Do you want to learn a hard, and possibly expensive, lesson before you take proper care of your business?

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In The News Inspiration IRS My Two Cents PSA Where We Are

All For Love

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“Valentine’s Day; red roses
It’s said that some have died for love.
In North Clark Street, Chicago
They died for money…”

It was with those words, uttered by Laurence Olivier, on a Paul Hardcastle song about greed, that Al Capone first fascinated me. It started with that tale of the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre – “It’s a good day to die,” the gangster laughed in a scene in the video – and it continued as I learned more about his legacy as a famous gangster. I mean, as perennially single as I have been most of my life, I have been known to don black clothing and disdain on February 14th, but to shoot a bunch of people on that day? That just seemed a little much. You couldn’t wait until the 15th? What kind of person does that? I found out that others were similarly outraged by Capone’s actions and expended a lot of time and energy trying to bring him down.

A few weeks ago, I was reminded of Al Capone when I spoke with Meredith Engel of The New York Daily News. She was reporting on the financial issues faced by those in the marijuana business. Marijuana is legal in some states, such as Colorado and Washington, but is still illegal on a federal level. This dichotomy may lead to confusion on what income is taxable on a state level, where pot is legal, and on a federal level, where it is illegal.

What does this have to do with Al Capone? Well, despite being blamed for the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, among other murders, and in spite of being investigated for racketeering and his bootlegging business, the authorities struggled to get Capone convicted on his gang-related crimes. However, there was a government agency that he had not seriously considered; the IRS. You see, it does not matter where your income comes from, be it from legal or illegal sources, you have to pay taxes on it.

It doesn’t matter whether you are selling pot or stealing from your boss, if you don’t pay taxes on that money coming into you, you cold find yourself in trouble with the IRS, ranging from interest and fines to imprisonment. Federal agents couldn’t find enough evidence to pin murder on Al Capone, but they were able to use forensic accounting methods to put together enough evidence to indict Capone on tax evasion charges. He was sentenced to 11 years in prison, was fined $50,000, was charged $7,692 in court costs and $215,000 plus interested in back taxes.

Preparing a tax return can get rather complicated. Figuring what deductions, exemptions and credits you are eligible for can be a like navigating a maze. However, the most simple part of the tax return is the income that you start with. If you don’t want to get into trouble with the IRS – REPORT ALL OF IT, regardless of how you came about it.

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In The News NYSSCPA

But Wait… There’s More. Get Up Close

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In The News PSA Where We Are

Ripped From My Headlines?

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“Aren’t you excited that they’re making a show about you?” This is how my friend, Tabeel, greeted me this morning.

A show about me and I haven’t been telling you all about it? Well, let me tell you, I’m as surprised as you are, but very delighted about the news. It’s about time. I watch way more than my share of crime shows. I have watched so much vintage Law & Order that I can pretty much tell when we are going to move from the Order to the Law and I can see a twist coming a mile away. When I see a new crime show being advertised on TV, I am pretty much always willing to give it a chance. I am held back from watching more crime-related shows because there are only 24 hours in day and I waste a lot of that time sleeping, working and interacting with the real world. For all the great and wonderful things that the shows do for me, I have a recurring gripe.

Every once in a while, on these shows, the investigators will have to solve a money-related issue and they’ll call in the forensic accountant. The guy, and it’s always a guy, who shows up always looks like he has not seen the light of day in years and appears to have forgotten how to interact with other human beings. His clothes and hair are out of style and the other investigators only put up with him because he talks, geekily, about where the money that they are trying to find went. The forensic accountant is that one guy on the show that no one wants to be. I mean, the coroners are more exciting than the forensic accountant and they deal with corpses!

But all of that is about to change. It is as though someone with access to a television network has been listening in on my conversations and hearing me yelling at the television. Tabeel shared with me that Shonda Rhimes is adding a new show to her resume, “The Catch”, and this show is a show about a forensic accountant. Not a show where a forensic accountant is released from the dungeon every once in a while, to look at numbers. The main character is a forensic accountant and the forensic accountant is a woman! Finally, someone found the right ear to whisper in – the stereotype is not reality. There is so much more to a forensic accountant than we have seen so far on television. At last, someone has decided to make a show about me!

I mean it totally has to be a show about me, right? A female, forensic accountant who is likely to be kick-ass and have many clever and insightful things to say. That’s totally how I roll. I look forward to this show, in between the dramatic twists and cliffhangers, highlighting some of the processes and nuances of what forensic accounting is about.It may begin a movement until finally Law & Order FAU (Forensic Accounting Unit) is launched. The forensic accountant is busting out of the basement and she’s taking no prisoners! Well, there probably be a lot of prisoners but you get what I’m saying. Look out for it, set your DVRs and dive into the world of the crime-fighting CPA!

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Enforcement The Fed Where We Are

The Sheriff in Town!

When I first went to university, I was unsure what I wanted to major in. I had been considering chemistry, because I fancied that I might be the person to come up with a cure for AIDS. At the idealistic age of 18, I was so sure that I could use the colorful magic of gas chromatography to come up with a solution that many experienced scientists with doctoral degrees had been unable to discover. I signed up for a chemistry class and, I decided to take an elective in economics. I was hooked after my first class and ended up majoring in economics. I was fascinated by various theories and the push and pull between fiscal and monetary policies. I did come away from my class knowing one thing – I wanted to work for the Federal Reserve System, home of US monetary policy. To me, to be part of an organization that was focused on what to do in order to best positively influence the economy of the entire nation was awesome! Federal Reserve Banks issue the money that we use; how cool is that? I remember going to a campus career fair and spending most of my time there chatting with a representative from the Fed. Following that conversation, getting a job at the Fed was my dream. One big obstacle stood in my way; at the time, I was not a US citizen. I was devastated but I still dreamt that one day I would either be a citizen or the Fed would change its policies, whichever came first. At the time, as an economist in training, my dream was to be an analyst.

As time has gone by (I am a citizen now) and I have gone on to add becoming a CPA and then getting Certified in Financial Forensics to my skill set, my interest in the Fed and what it does has grown. After graduating, with my degree in economics and mathematics, I went on to work at a bank, where I was an analyst. I was very excited about the opportunity to apply the theory I had learnt in college. I had not bargained on how people are not very good at following the rules, be they the rules of logic or the rule of law. I mean, how many times have you said, “Who would do that,” or “Why did they act that way? It doesn’t make sense”? Yep, we humans use our free will in the nuttiest ways. Just last week, I read a crazy story about a Georgia woman filing a tax return for a $94 million dollar refund. Every aspect of the story is insane, from her 100 dependents to thinking that she could pick up her refund check at a local Kroger grocery store, and yet she is neither the first or last person to attempt this kind of thing. So, after the monetary policy folks have come up with their ideas about how best to influence the economy, there need to be the people who make sure that people are not breaking the rules and people who create control systems and audit them to minimize the risk of people breaking the rules. This is where forensic accountants come into play at the Fed.

Forensic Accountants, both those Certified in Financial Forensics and those who are Certified Fraud Examiners, can be found in the audit and enforcement areas of the Federal Reserve System. The saying is that love makes the world go around, but we are all aware that money is a big motivator for who many people behave. I have written about the fraud triangle and how people in positions of trust and authority will break the law in pursuit of illicit gain. With this in mind, it is vital to assess and improve control systems to make sure that, starting at the top financial institution, there is little opportunity for those who feel the pressure to commit financial crime. If the top bank cannot keep money safe, what hope is there for the rest of them? The Fed has bank examiners whose goal is to ensure that banks comply with laws such as those governing anti-money laundering and doing business with nations and people that the US government has imposed sanctions upon. The Fed plays an important role as an independent third party that will objectively assess operations at the banks that they supervise to make sure that they are not, for example, helping criminal rings hide their ill-gotten gains.

There are twelve banks in the Federal Reserve System and each bill of paper money that you have incorporates, in its serial number, the letter assigned to bank that issued that bill. Pull out a banknote, be it a dollar or a $100 bill, it will have the letter of the particular Federal Reserve Bank that issued it, be it Boston, San Francisco or any of the ones in between. In the case of the dollar bill, the name of the issuing bank is also noted on the bill. It goes almost without saying that the institution that issues the money that we use should have top notch controls. Each Federal Reserve Bank, therefore, has audit departments that are constantly reviewing it and making sure that the banks are complying with the rules. The auditors also work to improve systems. Every day, people are spending a lot of time and energy trying to figure out how to game the system and so those at the Fed should spend at least as much time and energy working to keep the banks safe and compliant.

Though my focus has changed, my excitement when it comes to the Fed is unabated. Not only are they working on monetary policy, they are also working to make sure that the rules are not being broken and that the opportunity to defraud, steal or abet crime is diminished. Take a look at the money in your wallet and think about what goes into making it worth what it is worth.

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AICPA In The News NYSSCPA PSA Where We Are

Hear Ye, Hear Ye! It’s The Future!

 

Toward the end of June, I went into the New York State Society of CPAs offices (very lovely offices, I must say) to be part of a roundtable discussion on the future of the accounting profession. The discussion was distilled into a piece in August’s CPA Journal. Personal interest aside, it is a great read with a diversity of opinions on various issues regarding the CPA profession and the value of the designation. Along with me were three other professionals, all with different career paths within the designation of CPA. Somya Munjal is the founder of CPA for the People, which is a CPA services, business consulting and social venture firm. She is also the founder of Youthful Savings, whose mission is “empowering the next generation with financial education and entrepreneurship training”. Michael Durant is working on his master’s degree in taxation, while pursuing his CPA designation. That’s right, a master’s in taxation; that should begin to convey just how complicated taxation can be. Michael is also the cochairman of the advisory board for the Bronx School of Law and Finance, a school that he is an alumnus of. Jordan Frey is a senior account in EisnerAmper’s private business services group. As you can see on the company’s website, the group provides a wide range of services to businesses of all types and sizes. And then there is me – figuring financial forensics. So, in a room of four CPAs, you have a tax man, a social venture, financial education and entrepreneurship training guru, a private business services expert and a forensic accountant. Walking into the room, I was encouraged to find that I was in a room with people who validate my claims about the variety of professional paths that a CPA can take. It’s always a good feeling when your claims are validated.

We had a very interesting discussion about the different directions in which our CPA designation was taking us and, for all the differences in career we had, we had some real similarities. We were drawn by the high standards and ethics that are integral to being a CPA. I have written about how a CPA is considered to be a trusted professional, a characteristic that is an asset in someone you are dealing with when it comes to financial matters. I am happy to find that I am not alone. It is one thing for me to stand on my soap box and wax lyrical about the virtues of the CPA; it is completely something else, in a very good way, to be in a room with others who feel as passionately as I do about what we do.

I am sharing our conversations with you and, if you feel as though reading The CPA Journal diminishes your street cred, you can throw in a little Wu Tang Clan as your backing track, as you read a little bit about the future…