Tag Archives: recovery

If Lost… Then What?

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At the end of May, I was on my way to an event, when a flash of pink on the sidewalk caught my attention. I stopped and realized that I was looking at a small square of leather. I bent down, picked it up and turned it over in my hands. It was a wallet with a MetroCard, some credit and debit cards and a driver’s license in it. I pulled out the license, looked it over, and walked over to the restaurant that was a few feet away from where I had just found the wallet. I must have made a few people nervous, staring at them and then down at the license, to see if anyone there resembled the photo. No luck. I then pulled out my phone and tried a few quick searches, online, to see if I could figure out how to contact this woman. Her name was more common than I imagined; several options came up and none appeared to be her. Yes, her license had an address on it but, the license had been issued several years earlier and people in New York City can move around quite a bit, in search of amenities such as a view, an elevator or affordable rent. As I was running late, I decided to go to my event and put my search off until later. On my way, I spotted a parked police car. I got excited, thinking that I may be able to hand over the wallet, but the excitement faded when I got close to the car and found that there was no one sitting in it.

When I got home and had more time to do so, I hunted down the woman whose wallet I had found and delivered it to her. Even if she had cancelled her cards, I am sure she was happy to get her stuff back – who knows maybe her MetroCard still had 29 days of use left on it. That experience reminded me of a time, years ago, when someone stole my handbag at the airport. I was livid that someone had invaded my space and even stood yelling, in the terminal, for the thief to just take my cash and give me back my stuff. Suffice to say, that did not happen. I did, fortunately, have a kind gentleman give me money to get the train back home. However, a few weeks later, my phone rang and it was the airport, calling to tell me that my bag had been found. They had been able to contact me because I happened to have a dry-cleaning slip in my wallet, and my phone number was on it. I was lucky that I had that slip in my bag but these two events really got me thinking about recovery plans, not just in business, in other aspects of our lives.

With a wallet, for instance, you can keep a business card in the wallet, or put a small card in your wallet with an email address and/or phone number so that, should you be unlucky enough to lose the wallet and a kind stranger picks it up, they can contact you and figure out how to get it back to you. It is an easy thing to do and could be hugely useful. It doesn’t even have to be your usual email address, if you have fears about your inbox being inundated by unwanted email, you can create an email address that you keep for moments such as this.

We never think that we will either lose our stuff or have it stolen from us but it can happen to any of us. It can be personal or it can be a business loss, such as a system crash, or theft and, in all cases, having a recovery plan will go a long way to make recovery less stressful and less expensive. If, at this very moment, you lost everything on your computer, what would you do? Does the thought give you heart palpitations because you would lose very important data, with no way of getting it back? Would you have to shell out a lot of money and spend valuable time working to try to recover everything? Would you wonder whether or not your business could survive such a loss? If this thought is a scary one to you, you should be thinking about sitting down with trusted professionals, to create and put a comprehensive protection and recovery plan in place. You should review various scenarios, even if you think it wouldn’t happen to you. Things to consider when doing this:

  • Are you backing up your data on a regular basis? Automating this process is a great way to make sure that it happens – you don’t want it to all depend on your remembering to do it.
  • Where are you keeping your backups? Do you keep a backup offsite and unconnected to your current system? You don’t want your backup corrupted, should your system go down.
  • Are you checking the integrity of your backups? It isn’t helpful to think you have been creating backups and find out, when you need the backup, that the process was not occurring.
  • Now that you have backups, do you have a recovery plan? Do you know what you are going to do should things go awry? Does your staff know? Do you have the plan in writing and in a space where it can be easily accessed? Have you trained your staff in this recovery process?

There are people who are well-trained in helping you create a backup and recovery plan and that can start with your CPA. You want someone who has experience and knowledge regarding best practices that are practical, useful and effective.

We are humans who work with technology that we have built and we must, therefore acknowledge that we are not infallible and we must therefore create, review and update our contingency plans. And that plan can never just be relying on the kindness of strangers.

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