Tag Archives: recovery

Even When You Don’t Want To…

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Linda Kadzombe

Linda was not my friend. I was in high school, sitting in the car, in the school parking lot, with my father, waiting for my little sister to show up. She ran up, with a friend and they stood by the car, smiling and sporting matching nose rings. My father looked up and the two girls, and their matching noses, and exclaimed – “I suppose nose rings are part of the school uniform now.” That is my first significant memory of Linda, who was my sister’s friend. Along with a great group of friends, Linda and I rang in 2000 in Victoria Falls. We talked about the fact that we were both moving the United States and we promised to keep in touch with each other. This vague promise turned into a relationship that the word “friend” does not do justice. With our families far away, we checked in with each other almost every day and often the conversation started this way: “Just checking in. I’m alive.” Once, I called Linda when I stuck in a dress I had ordered online and that I was trying on. She was living in Boston and I was in New York City and yet, she was the first number I thought of dialing. We were travel buddies and talked about becoming the sweet old lady travelers that we often came across during our trips. We shared a love of European chocolate and I was a person she taught, and gave permission, to stab her with an EpiPen should the need arise.

On March 6th, I received a call that had never even drifted into my imagination. While flying back home from an epic vacation with her cousins, Linda passed away. The news was devastating; it still is. At the same time, there was a lot to do. Whether or not you have planned for death, when death happens, there is a lot that needs to be done, not only to put your loved one to rest but also to sort out your loved one’s affairs. Friends and family came together for Linda and, as we navigated various issues, we were frustrated, energized, and touched, often all at the same moment. It made me think about the importance of planning, not only for the workplace, but also for one’s personal life.

The first step is the dreaded will. No one wants to ever think about their mortality but, even when you think you have nothing, you always have enough to put in a will. At the very least, you have your wishes. Even when you think to yourself – oh, I am single, and/or I don’t have children – you still should have a will. Remember that a will is a legal document and you should be sure to comply with the law, or your will may not be accepted as binding. For instance, the rules about whether or not a handwritten will is recognized varies by state. You should also see if your financial accounts can be set up to be transferrable or payable upon death, as this will save survivors the headaches of dealing with probate court. In addition to letting people know what you want done with your stuff, you should also think about how and where you wish to be laid to rest, if that is something that is important to you.

We live in an age of paperless billing and most business being transacted through online accounts. This means that, for many of us, all our accounts have a login and information about accounts and their existence may only exist in our email accounts. To questions about what accounts and liabilities Linda might have, we could only shrug and guess. Dashlane estimates that the average user has 90 online accounts! Consider making a list of your accounts that you will keep safeguarded in a safe, or with a lawyer, if you keep your will with a lawyer. There are various ways in which to work to both safeguard your personal information and also ensure that your accounts are known and closed correctly, after passing.

If you don’t already have it, get life insurance. The policy doesn’t have to be a big one; just enough to cover the costs that may come up due to death. These include:

  • Payment of final expenses;
  • Taking care of your loved ones, if you have loved ones that depend on you;
  • Payment of debts, so that your next of kin are not on the hook for them;
  • Payment of estate taxes

It may seem horribly morbid to talk about death and it is certainly no fun to deal with the affairs of a loved one. In the midst of grief, you don’t want to deal with some of the headaches that can pop up around the administration of everything – dealing with hospitals, funteral homes, airlines or whatever. Fortunately, Linda had an amazing network of people who loved her (and some incredibly kind strangers who saved the day more than once). All worked hard to get her home and laid to rest near her family. We also were able to spend a lot of quality time with friends and family that we had long promised to spend time with you. You know how that happens – next week, next month or next summer turns into ten years. However, through it all, we had a lot of figuring out how to do something or where to find things because we had never even thought about navigating this terrain.

Take some time to think about what you have and what you want done about it. Talk to your loved ones and tell them to make plans, if they have not already. Remember that it is never too early to plan and, unfortunately, often too late.

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If Lost… Then What?

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At the end of May, I was on my way to an event, when a flash of pink on the sidewalk caught my attention. I stopped and realized that I was looking at a small square of leather. I bent down, picked it up and turned it over in my hands. It was a wallet with a MetroCard, some credit and debit cards and a driver’s license in it. I pulled out the license, looked it over, and walked over to the restaurant that was a few feet away from where I had just found the wallet. I must have made a few people nervous, staring at them and then down at the license, to see if anyone there resembled the photo. No luck. I then pulled out my phone and tried a few quick searches, online, to see if I could figure out how to contact this woman. Her name was more common than I imagined; several options came up and none appeared to be her. Yes, her license had an address on it but, the license had been issued several years earlier and people in New York City can move around quite a bit, in search of amenities such as a view, an elevator or affordable rent. As I was running late, I decided to go to my event and put my search off until later. On my way, I spotted a parked police car. I got excited, thinking that I may be able to hand over the wallet, but the excitement faded when I got close to the car and found that there was no one sitting in it.

When I got home and had more time to do so, I hunted down the woman whose wallet I had found and delivered it to her. Even if she had cancelled her cards, I am sure she was happy to get her stuff back – who knows maybe her MetroCard still had 29 days of use left on it. That experience reminded me of a time, years ago, when someone stole my handbag at the airport. I was livid that someone had invaded my space and even stood yelling, in the terminal, for the thief to just take my cash and give me back my stuff. Suffice to say, that did not happen. I did, fortunately, have a kind gentleman give me money to get the train back home. However, a few weeks later, my phone rang and it was the airport, calling to tell me that my bag had been found. They had been able to contact me because I happened to have a dry-cleaning slip in my wallet, and my phone number was on it. I was lucky that I had that slip in my bag but these two events really got me thinking about recovery plans, not just in business, in other aspects of our lives.

With a wallet, for instance, you can keep a business card in the wallet, or put a small card in your wallet with an email address and/or phone number so that, should you be unlucky enough to lose the wallet and a kind stranger picks it up, they can contact you and figure out how to get it back to you. It is an easy thing to do and could be hugely useful. It doesn’t even have to be your usual email address, if you have fears about your inbox being inundated by unwanted email, you can create an email address that you keep for moments such as this.

We never think that we will either lose our stuff or have it stolen from us but it can happen to any of us. It can be personal or it can be a business loss, such as a system crash, or theft and, in all cases, having a recovery plan will go a long way to make recovery less stressful and less expensive. If, at this very moment, you lost everything on your computer, what would you do? Does the thought give you heart palpitations because you would lose very important data, with no way of getting it back? Would you have to shell out a lot of money and spend valuable time working to try to recover everything? Would you wonder whether or not your business could survive such a loss? If this thought is a scary one to you, you should be thinking about sitting down with trusted professionals, to create and put a comprehensive protection and recovery plan in place. You should review various scenarios, even if you think it wouldn’t happen to you. Things to consider when doing this:

  • Are you backing up your data on a regular basis? Automating this process is a great way to make sure that it happens – you don’t want it to all depend on your remembering to do it.
  • Where are you keeping your backups? Do you keep a backup offsite and unconnected to your current system? You don’t want your backup corrupted, should your system go down.
  • Are you checking the integrity of your backups? It isn’t helpful to think you have been creating backups and find out, when you need the backup, that the process was not occurring.
  • Now that you have backups, do you have a recovery plan? Do you know what you are going to do should things go awry? Does your staff know? Do you have the plan in writing and in a space where it can be easily accessed? Have you trained your staff in this recovery process?

There are people who are well-trained in helping you create a backup and recovery plan and that can start with your CPA. You want someone who has experience and knowledge regarding best practices that are practical, useful and effective.

We are humans who work with technology that we have built and we must, therefore acknowledge that we are not infallible and we must therefore create, review and update our contingency plans. And that plan can never just be relying on the kindness of strangers.

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