Tag Archives: refunds

That’s Not How It Goes

canine_side-eyeI am a huge sports fan. Huge. It is just about the only time that I tend to watch live television. The drawback, in my opinion, is that I have to watch all the ads on television, even the ones that get on my nerves. It is a sacrifice I am willing to make in order to get my game in real-time but, sometimes, I wonder. We are in the midst of basketball and tax seasons and the two have, apparently, come together to try to give me an aneurism or, at the very least, high blood pressure. You see, there are a variety of tax preparation related ads, declaring that it is time to get the mountains of money due to you and how easy it is to just do it all yourself, while you’re at it. I just hold my head and mutter, “no, no, no, no!”

Ad after ad trumpets that the product advertised will get you the largest tax refund around. So, what happens when you file your taxes and you don’t get a big refund; maybe you don’t get a refund at all? Do you get upset? Do you feel that your tax preparation software or professional has done wrong by you? But a refund is the government paying you back money that you overpaid them in the first place. Getting a large refund doesn’t mean that you lucked out and won the government lottery; it means that, over the year, you sent the government too much money and now the money is sending that money back to you, interest free.

Refund tales aside, there is the matter of how complicated the tax code is, something that even the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) writes about. The 2014 Tax Guide, a publication that the IRS puts out to help guide individuals who are filing their taxes is a daunting 288 pages long and that’s before the references in the guide for further information on the subjects covered. So, I am sure you can begin to understand my frustration when I see ads that imply that preparing a tax return is as simple as baking a cake. It is unclear how long the tax code is currently, but what we do know is that it gets longer and more complicated by the year.

Computer software is incredibly helpful, when it comes to tax preparation. However, it is paramount to keep in mind that the software is a tool and it will not automatically make you an expert, knowledgeable of the ins and outs of the tax code. If your tax return is straightforward, the chances are that you will be okay filing your own return. Say, however, that you have a business; do you know which of your expenses are deductible and which are not? If you are married, and you decide to file separately, instead of jointly with your spouse, do you know what the differences are between the two? What about if you have spent the year speculating, buying and selling assets, or if you gambled a lot and have significant winnings or losses? The software can only work with what you give it and what if the software doesn’t ask you the right questions in order to get as much information needed in order to have as accurate a tax return as possible?

At the end of the day, the IRS holds you responsible for errors in your tax return and the amount of taxes you pay (and what you claim as a refund). The last thing you want is to be hit with a notice telling you that you owe the IRS a bunch of money because, when they do that, they tend to also charge you interest and penalties. Some tax preparers will tell you that they will cover only penalties and interest due to errors on a tax return, but what about the erroneous tax refund that you have already spent? Yup, only you have to deal with that. It seems like the punishment is a lot worse than just messing up a cake recipe, right? So, I’m thinking that getting a qualified professional, such as a CPA, to prepare your taxes might be worth your investment. Don’t go with someone who promises you the largest refund; go with someone who has studied the law and takes continuing education to stay up to date on the intricacies of the tax code and not only how you will be affected federally but also on a state and local level. Yeah, state and local – I didn’t even go into all that. Find someone who knows what they are doing and who can tell you what is going on and why. Or, you could try to tackle the bigger than the bible tax code and do it all yourself. You’ve got time, right?

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