Tag Archives: Technology

Even When You Don’t Want To…

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Linda Kadzombe

Linda was not my friend. I was in high school, sitting in the car, in the school parking lot, with my father, waiting for my little sister to show up. She ran up, with a friend and they stood by the car, smiling and sporting matching nose rings. My father looked up and the two girls, and their matching noses, and exclaimed – “I suppose nose rings are part of the school uniform now.” That is my first significant memory of Linda, who was my sister’s friend. Along with a great group of friends, Linda and I rang in 2000 in Victoria Falls. We talked about the fact that we were both moving the United States and we promised to keep in touch with each other. This vague promise turned into a relationship that the word “friend” does not do justice. With our families far away, we checked in with each other almost every day and often the conversation started this way: “Just checking in. I’m alive.” Once, I called Linda when I stuck in a dress I had ordered online and that I was trying on. She was living in Boston and I was in New York City and yet, she was the first number I thought of dialing. We were travel buddies and talked about becoming the sweet old lady travelers that we often came across during our trips. We shared a love of European chocolate and I was a person she taught, and gave permission, to stab her with an EpiPen should the need arise.

On March 6th, I received a call that had never even drifted into my imagination. While flying back home from an epic vacation with her cousins, Linda passed away. The news was devastating; it still is. At the same time, there was a lot to do. Whether or not you have planned for death, when death happens, there is a lot that needs to be done, not only to put your loved one to rest but also to sort out your loved one’s affairs. Friends and family came together for Linda and, as we navigated various issues, we were frustrated, energized, and touched, often all at the same moment. It made me think about the importance of planning, not only for the workplace, but also for one’s personal life.

The first step is the dreaded will. No one wants to ever think about their mortality but, even when you think you have nothing, you always have enough to put in a will. At the very least, you have your wishes. Even when you think to yourself – oh, I am single, and/or I don’t have children – you still should have a will. Remember that a will is a legal document and you should be sure to comply with the law, or your will may not be accepted as binding. For instance, the rules about whether or not a handwritten will is recognized varies by state. You should also see if your financial accounts can be set up to be transferrable or payable upon death, as this will save survivors the headaches of dealing with probate court. In addition to letting people know what you want done with your stuff, you should also think about how and where you wish to be laid to rest, if that is something that is important to you.

We live in an age of paperless billing and most business being transacted through online accounts. This means that, for many of us, all our accounts have a login and information about accounts and their existence may only exist in our email accounts. To questions about what accounts and liabilities Linda might have, we could only shrug and guess. Dashlane estimates that the average user has 90 online accounts! Consider making a list of your accounts that you will keep safeguarded in a safe, or with a lawyer, if you keep your will with a lawyer. There are various ways in which to work to both safeguard your personal information and also ensure that your accounts are known and closed correctly, after passing.

If you don’t already have it, get life insurance. The policy doesn’t have to be a big one; just enough to cover the costs that may come up due to death. These include:

  • Payment of final expenses;
  • Taking care of your loved ones, if you have loved ones that depend on you;
  • Payment of debts, so that your next of kin are not on the hook for them;
  • Payment of estate taxes

It may seem horribly morbid to talk about death and it is certainly no fun to deal with the affairs of a loved one. In the midst of grief, you don’t want to deal with some of the headaches that can pop up around the administration of everything – dealing with hospitals, funteral homes, airlines or whatever. Fortunately, Linda had an amazing network of people who loved her (and some incredibly kind strangers who saved the day more than once). All worked hard to get her home and laid to rest near her family. We also were able to spend a lot of quality time with friends and family that we had long promised to spend time with you. You know how that happens – next week, next month or next summer turns into ten years. However, through it all, we had a lot of figuring out how to do something or where to find things because we had never even thought about navigating this terrain.

Take some time to think about what you have and what you want done about it. Talk to your loved ones and tell them to make plans, if they have not already. Remember that it is never too early to plan and, unfortunately, often too late.

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Three Words for 2018? We Got This!

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Over the last week, I have been thinking about 2018. I don’t know about you, but 2018 snuck up on me. One moment I was caught up in the day-to-day of 2017 and the next moment 2018 was just a couple of weeks away! After my initial panic, I thought – well, it’s great because I get to think of my three words. Three words? Well, if you haven’t been on this journey with me before, I shall explain. In 2012, I met and was inspired by Tom Hood and he introduced me to the Three Words approach, which came from Chris Brogan. At the start of every year, now, I sit and think about what three words I would like to guide me through that year. During the year, I come back to those words, to help center, direct and motivate me. Over the last few days, I have thought about how to make this work better for me, and I determined that I must display these words to remind me, even when I am not thinking about being reminded, to move me when I feel stuck and to hold me accountable. I say this in part because, 2017 was a challenging year for me and I found that I often lost track of my guiding lights. Involved in, and sometimes overwhelmed by, the moment, I often forgot to even look for my words. Putting the words everywhere, will go a long way to keeping me mindful of that.

Last year, I started looking back over my year and I have found this to be a great way to assess how things went and to help me set my intentions for 2018. My three words:

Imagine. This is the first word that came to me. During 2017, in part through work and volunteering with the New York State Society of CPAs and the AICPA, I have had some truly new experiences. I have learnt how to play poker and how poker skills can benefit me in the workplace; I have worked with a team to consciously inch towards better health – physically, emotionally, and spiritually – and that has included laughing more and skating in Byrant Park; I have collaborated with incredible people and presented in various spaces, from a national conferences to a college campus. During the year, I have been involved in conversations that have opened my eyes, that have ventured into spaces that are often afraid to even tiptoe into, that have renewed my hope when things have seemed bleak. I have often reminded myself to listen and to hear because that is when I find the moments that hit me hard and that get me to imagine and those moments are incredible. When we imagine, and step outside of what we know, we can find brilliance, we can find understanding and, just as important, we can also see and revise the not so great. In 2018, I want to imagine without fear of where my imagination will lead me. I want to imagine and be okay with when what I imagine doesn’t always work out. I also want to make sure that I make the time and space for my imagination. Back in 2015, I tried to create space for me to be bored, which is a big part of creating the space for imagination and, as the exercise stated, brilliance. It did free my mind in great ways and, looking back and looking at now, I know I need a lot more boredom in my life. And I still haven’t finished my Starry Night jigsaw puzzle!

Innovate. During 2017, I listened and took part in conversations about change. The conversations were about artificial intelligence (AI) about blockchain (and cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin) and about cybersecurity. Other conversations were about what diversity, inclusion, and belonging mean and if and why it is important. We had conversations about what to do about all the change happening in our professions, in our world and in our lives. We talked about how we react to it and how we can embrace, be ahead of and even create greatness out of all the change. Beyond the conversations, we brainstormed and tried new things. We looked at the new approaches other took and ran with them. I spend a lot of time looking at challenges and how, sometimes, people take the same approach to resolving them and see minuscule results. As much as we tout how “change is good”, it is a human thing to resist changing the status quo. During this year, I want to innovate. I want to collaborate and brainstorm and determine to try something new. I want to embrace the difficult conversations, appreciate and improve upon feedback and, on my part, provide truly constructive feedback. I want to remember the power of synergy and never forget that the best innovations come through a community of people sharing, listening and taking risks.

Act. My third word came to me after I wrote and thought about my 2017 look back. When it comes to training, I have established and go with what gets me to success. If I have a race, I print up a daily timetable that includes rest days, cross training days and exactly what I shall do on each day (distance, goals, tempos if needed). The night before every training, I put out exactly what I am going to wear on the day and I determine my route. I think about and take away all my excuses so that, when I wake up, I just do exactly as planned and that gets me a step closer to where I need to go. I keep my schedule on the wall and tick off each day as I go along. During 2017, I often did not apply this approach. As a result, especially where I felt the stakes were high, I became adept at getting cold feet, at second-guessing myself and at putting things off until I decided it was too late to do them. There are many reasons why this happened but knowing the reasons and doing nothing about them is not helpful. I am going to do more acting in 2018. To help me do this, I am going to find the ways to take away my excuses, and I am also going to be more realistic about what I can get done, so that I don’t end up doing many things in a mediocre manner that only serves to disappoint me and others. I also must remember to be kinder to myself when I act and to see the power in action. I must remember that it is through action that I can bring value and have impact.

Before diving into 2018, I want to take a moment and meditate upon my previous three words:

2013 – Change, Discover & Motivate
2014 – Transform, Pursue & Collaborate
2015 – Receptive, Synergy & Service
2016 – Learn Fear & Community
2017 – Embrace, Persevere & Monchu

Several years ago, I went to Hawaii with friends and decided to take surfing lessons. I was a couple of months out of surgery and hesitated before I went out – I wasn’t at full strength, everyone else was going on a fun outing and I would be doing this solo, as no one else was interested. But, I had been thinking about taking a surfing lesson and I had told my surfing neighbor (who ultimately became my husband) that I was going to take a lesson and that made me feel accountable. During the lesson, I fell countless times, I scraped my knee and sometimes even got to the point where I was able to ride a wave while kneeling on the board. Then, I stood, and rode, and didn’t fall off. It was glorious and totally worth every fall, and the skin missing from my leg. When I finally fell off the board, I rose out of the water with a victorious yell! It is this that I must remember – it is a journey but it can only happen if I Imagine, Innovate AND Act.

Happy and wordy 2018 to you! Please share with me – what are your words for 2018?

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Oh, Not So Much Fun…

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On Christmas day, I was chatting with my niece, during family celebrations. My phone buzzed and I saw a notification that she had just sent me a message. That was truly odd, because, as I mentioned, we were chatting and, unless she was using her telepathic skills, she was not texting at the same time. Nevertheless, I asked her if she had sent me a message. She looked at me as though I had lost my mind, but double checked her phone and shrugged. It wasn’t me, she said and carried on with her day. Since she was engaging with people and not her phone, and because we were having a fun time with family, I decided that the likely bad news could wait.

I attended a talk earlier in the year where the speaker told us – There are two types of people: those who have been hacked, and those that don’t know it yet. By the time we got home, my niece had gone from being in the latter group to being a panicked person in the former. Often, a person finds out that they have been hacked when, as happened to my niece, their contacts complain about spam messages that they have received from that person. However, more and more often, people don’t know that they have effectively been hacked because the party hacked is a company that is holding people’s information.

In 2017, the most notorious example was, on 17 September, when the credit reporting agency, Equifax was hacked. Initially, the information was that about 143 million people might have been impacted. However, that number has climbed and what kind of information was accessed was vague. When people tried to check with Equifax, they often got different responses each time that they tried. Also, as the months have gone by, the number of people impacted has climbed. If Yahoo! is anything to go by, who knows what the final count will be. The best advice to take right now, is to assume you have been impacted and to take preventative steps and, if you have not already done so, freeze your credit with all four of the major credit reporting agencies.

What is unsettling about how companies announce that they have been hacked is how long it takes for the news to come out. Equifax claimed that it discovered their breach at the end of July but they only made a public announcement in the middle of September. It was only in October 2017 that Yahoo announced that all of its accounts were hacked in 2013. That’s not a typo; they are telling us that if you had Yahoo, Flickr, Tumblr, or any other account owned by Yahoo, you were hacked in 2013. What is anyone supposed to do with that information, four years later? This is worse than a “Look out for falling ice” sign. In November, we found out that Uber had been hacked in 2016 and that the company had opted to pay off the hackers to destroy the information and keep the hack quiet.

The big takeaway is that it may be a while before anyone lets you know that you have been hacked and, unless you live completely off the grid, it is smart, and safe, to assume that you have been hacked. That said, there are steps that you can take to try to minimize the damage that can be caused by hacking:

  • Freeze your credit with the major credit bureaus. Learning about the Equifax breach was especially frustrating because people do not choose to share their information with the credit bureaus. I rolled my eyes at a headline that referred to “customers” being compromised. The best one can do right now (beyond not having a credit history of any kind) is to try to limit how much information gets out.
  • Check your credit regularly. Do this at least quarterly, to make sure that cards have not been opened in your name and without your permission. Annual Credit Report is the only website, authorized by federal law to provide you with a free credit report from a credit reporting agency every twelve months. A great way to spread out the checking over the year is to get a report from one of the agencies every 4 months (instead of getting all three in one fell swoop).
  • Use two factor authentication. This gives extra security over only using a password. The most common method of two factor authentication is having a company send you a text with a unique code, before you can complete logging into an account.
  • Don’t click on every link you come across. If you receive an email with a link and it is not something you have been expecting (and sometimes even if it is something you have been expecting) don’t click on a link because it is there. Check the email to make sure you recognize where the message is coming from.
  • If you trust the link and have clicked on it, still be careful about what information that you share. If you start to feel as though a company is asking for too much – either over the phone or through a website, stop sharing information. Find out, independently, if you really need to share that information and, again, make sure you know who you are sharing your information with and why.

Try to include these in your list of New Year’s resolutions. It won’t stop you from being hacked but at least, it may improve your chances of finding out about it early and taking appropriate steps.

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Makes You WannaCry

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A couple of years ago a lawyer friend told me about clients who were coming to her office, panicked because their computers had been locked by parties claiming to be the FBI. In order to get their machines unlocked, these fake FBI agents demanded to be paid a ransom. On Friday, over 200,000 machines were locked by people (I assume it was more than one person) who did not even pretend to be good. They encrypted the information on these machines and demanded $300 to $600 per machine or, they threatened, all the data on those machines would be destroyed. This type of attack is called a ransomware attack. A program is introduced into the machine, and it locks and encrypts all the data on the machine. A message pops up on the infected machine demanding that money be paid, almost always via bitcoin. Once the ransom has been paid, the message says, a method to unlock the machine will be sent. If the ransom is not paid within the time demanded, all the data on the machine will be erased. So much of our lives, both personal and business, is stored on computers; can you imagine what would happen if your computer was locked? The mere thought makes my heart speed up.

Earlier this year, a hacker crew called Shadow Brokers released several tools used by the National Security Agency (NSA). Among these tools was one called EternalBlue and this tool exploited a flaw in Microsoft Windows. Armed with the information that was leaked, Microsoft created a patch to fix this flaw and released this patch in March. Perhaps you have now read this far and you are wondering, if the patch was released in March, how did this massive attack happen in May? How many times has a message popped up on your machine while you are in the middle of something. The message tells you that an update is available for your machine. You see it, but you are in the middle of something important. You close the window and delay the update. This can happen over and over again. Some people, irritated by the notices, turn off the alerts altogether. Now, these automatic alerts are only available on versions of Windows that Microsoft is still actively supporting. So, if you have an older version of Windows, such as XP, Windows 8 or Windows Server 2003, you no longer receive alerts for updates. Either way, there are millions of machines that were vulnerable to attack on Friday. And on Friday, ransomware aptly called WannaCry, wreaked havoc all over the world.

It is believed that the attackers gained access to computers and systems using infected zip files attached to emails. People opened emails and clicked on attachments. These emails did not come from friends and the people clicked on attachments, not knowing what they were opening. Taking advantage of the fact that many organizations store their computer information on servers, making all users interconnected. The WannaCry ransomware, once released by one user, made its way through the interconnected systems and attacked other machines, even those belonging to people who did not click on the infected attachments.

This attack has made many things apparent:

  • Keeping secrets can sometimes go very wrong. The NSA knew that there was a vulnerability in Microsoft Windows. If it was not for the Shadow Brokers leak, Microsoft may not have discovered this vulnerability and they would not have developed a patch to fix it. One can also argue that, if Shadow Brokers had not leaked this information, the hackers may not have known to create WannaCry and none of this would have happened in the first place. I have found, though, that generally speaking, secrets are not kept that way forever.
  • When I wrote about the fake FBI attacks, I stated the importance of keeping your computers up to date. I cannot stress this enough. When the reminders pop up on your machine to update your software, update your software. Install the security fixes. If you don’t want to be disturbed, set up a timetable so that your machine will automatically check for and install updates on a regular basis. Remember, also, to restart your machine on a regular basis. Many installations are not complete without a restart and some updates are triggered by a restart.
  • We live in a time where everyone receives more email than they want to deal with. We run the risk of making careless mistakes, opening up emails and clicking on attachments when we have no idea who sent the email and what is in the attachment. Nowadays, you are almost lucky if the only thing that the attachment does is send out a lot of spam to your friends. More often, click on that attachment can lead to hackers stealing information from you or holding your machine hostage. Sometimes, even when I receive an email, with an attachment, that appears to be from a friend, I will double-check with the friend to make sure that they have sent the email and their account has not been hacked. The extra step may seem tedious but, enough times I have found out that my friend was hacked, so I keep asking when I am suspicious.
  • If your operating system is no longer supported, you should consider getting new software that is. I say this with mixed feelings. Like most people, I hate being forced to buy something when what I already have has been working well for me and when I don’t like the new version. I feel scammed being made to spend that extra money and if the world only contained righteous people I would tell you to keep your software and change it when you are ready. But, we live in a world where people are ready to take advantage of an opportunity to get money out of you. Microsoft stopped providing support for Windows XP in 2014. This ransomware is specifically taking advantage of this fact. It’s a shame, but it is the way it is.
  • Back up, Back up and back up some more. If you are regularly backing up your machine and keeping the backup either in the cloud or on an external drive, you know what you can do when your machine is held for ransom? You can ignore the ransom demand because you have your data saved some place safe. The clock can tick down, the files on your machine can all be delete and, even though it will suck to restore everything, you can do so.

On Monday morning, people are going to go to work and turn on their machines and many machines running Windows XP or that have not been updated in months will be open to attack. Many of those that are attacked will want to pay the ransom because their data has not been backed. Just weeks ago, articles were written about how British hospitals spent nothing on cyber-defense.  On Friday, they could barely function. Maybe they had started having meetings and started discussing taking steps to protect their systems. But, like we all do when that warning popped up, they put it off. I am sure right now they are wishing they had done something to protect themselves because they had to scramble to fix a disaster.

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A Better Mousetrap

IMG_2078Growing up, Saturday was the day that my mother ran errands and, because she tended to attack several items on her to-do list in one car trip, she tended to drag us along with her. At times errands involved going to the grocery shopping and this invariably meant my mother paid the bill by check. Now, writing out a check takes long enough but my mother never rushed the process, and I mean never. She would write out the check amount in numbers and words, pausing to direct the packer not to mix food types in the same bag. She would sign the check slowly, and beautifully and then, just when you thought she was done, she would balance her checkbook. It did not matter how long the line behind her was, she would take her time and complete her process. It did not matter how much grumbling was going on, she would ignore everyone, as she made sure that her numbers were correct.

Last week, I returned from an amazing trip to Zimbabwe, where I was the maid of honor at my sister’s wedding. I love traveling to Zimbabwe for countless reasons; one of these is seeing the changes to the financial systems that I see every time I go back. My last trip to Zimbabwe was a little over a year ago and I wrote about the process I went through in order to get a prepaid phone line. During this trip, I only had to deal with two people and I did not have to travel from one desk to another in order to get things done. I still had to hand over identification but this time, I could hand over the original and the phone company made a copy for me. The system was more computerized and I only needed to deal with one agent but I left with sufficient paperwork for my transaction. The SIM card for my phone line and airtime both had pre-printed serial numbers and I also received one receipt for my transaction, where I bought a line and airtime.

Just about everywhere I went, I was struck by the technological advancements since my last trip. More and more transactions are becoming completely computerized and the changes give me the opportunity to observe whether the advancements have weakened control systems and whether the designs of the new systems took control systems into account. One place where we saw significant changes was with the highway toll system. Last year, most of the toll stations were merely agents standing at a point in the road, with armed guards to make sure that no one tried to fly through the stations without paying. This year, there were built up with automatic booms that let drivers through, after they had paid. These stations had cameras installed in various places and these cameras transmitted images to a central office, as one of the controls to ensure that all vehicles passing through the stations were charged. Just as had happened the year before, every time we drove through a toll station, we received a receipt for our payment. The additional controls, such as the automatic boom and the cameras, added layers of controls without adding time to the process of going through the tollgates.

The challenge, when it comes to the technological advancements, is to ensure that those using them do not pave their cowpaths. This is a concept very well explained by Tom Hood. There is a big risk of using new technologies to do the same things in the same way; instead of using these technologies reimagine processes. It is very easy to dress up the same old processes in a fancy new exterior and convince yourself that you have created a new process. I shall keep taking notes during my future trips, as technological advancements continue to see whether people are paving cowpaths or creating superhighways.

Thankfully for those standing in line behind her, my mother no longer writes checks when she goes shopping. She has found new ways to keep track of her finances that ensure that her numbers are correct but that take less time than writing a check and balancing her checkbook used to. I even had a paper trail for the exhilarating lion walk that I went on at Antelope Park, a lion conservancy just outside Gweru, in Zimbabwe. I had a receipt for my payment and I also signed an indemnity form to prove that I went willingly, just in case the lions got grumpy, smelt my fear or just wanted to play with me with their massive paws!

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You Better Think

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I just spent the last two weeks in Zimbabwe and Mozambique. I was over there to have a wedding and then go on honeymoon. Before I left the United States, I decided that I would get a prepaid line in Zimbabwe, with roaming capabilities in Mozambique. In this way. I would have a way to communicate while traveling. We went in to the phone store to purchase a line and air time and that, in and of itself, was a tale to tell. We came out of the store with almost no idea what we had. After telling the cashier in the phone store what we wanted to use our line for, she suggested that we buy $20 in air time and sent us on our way. We had no idea how much time we could spend on the phone, what the roaming rates would be while we were in Mozambique and we had no clue what was going on with our data. As a long time cellphone user, I was pretty sure that I could figure it all out.

Well, it turns out that sometimes a new system can be more complicated than one can imagine. I realized, pretty quickly, that I would have done well to have received an instruction manual or some basic training. I would have tried to search for information online, except I had no idea how to activate my data. After figuring out how to convert some of my air time minutes into data, I made a call to customer service to receive instructions on how to actually activate data on my phone. After a second call, I actually got data to work but I had no idea how to track my data use, how much data I was using or how much data I had left to use. The data availability was very erratic; sometimes I had it and then, randomly, it would be gone. When I asked a friend, who has recently moved to Zimbabwe, how it all worked he said that he couldn’t understand any of it. So I decided to enjoy my vacation, appreciate any data I did get and not sweat the stretches of time when I had no data at all.

Because we were moving around a lot, we also had very limited access to wi-fi. As a result, we spent a very lo-tech fortnight. Because I could not always get the internet to work, I was never able to Google anything. I was forced to remember what I had learnt about something or to perhaps wonder whether I had learnt it at all. It turns out that the people we spent time with also had a very different relationship with the internet than I have been accustomed to. Not once during the two weeks we were in Southern Africa did a person consult Google during a discussion. Conversations were very interesting – a group of five people could end up with five very different recollections of an event – what happened, who was involved, what the outcome was and what was behind the action. These conversations would be fascinating because as a listener, I would have to decide, all by myself, what to believe. Without access to the convenience of an internet search, I had to think things through and choose whether to be analytical or emotional when coming to some conclusions (or at least how to balance my approach). It was fun and refreshing to give my brain this workout and it also led to some very exciting and, sometimes, very funny conversations.

Though I return to my easy (and, at times, lazy) access to internet information, I hope that I do not forget the lessons of my brain exercise. I really do appreciate the reminder that it is important to unplug at times and take time to listen, think and work things out. Having technology is incredibly useful and beneficial but one must not depend on technology at the expense of processing information and reaching conclusions using our brains. This is a vital thing to remember, especially is this age of big data. Having a lot of data and not knowing how to use it, what questions to ask of it or what it all really means is as useful as not having any information at all – at times it may even be more dangerous.

I am very happy to be able to get data at the touch of a button but I am also glad to be reminded to use my head more, ask questions and consider my possible answers.

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